Louis Comfort Tiffany - Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida Paintings

    • 20 X 24 in
    • $159.95
    • 24 X 36 in
    • $268.95
    • 30 X 40 in
    • $361.95
    • 36 X 48 in
    • $476.95
    • 48 X 72 in
    • $962.95
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    Other paintings by Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida:

    Los Palangreros
    Los Palangreros
    Los Picos Tower
    Los Picos Tower
    Lucrecia Arana
    Lucrecia Arana
    Lucrecia Arana with her Son
    Lucrecia Arana with her Son
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    Joaquin Sorolla y BastidaJoaquin Sorolla y Bastida was born in Valencia. As a student, he spent time in Rome and Paris. Soon, from 1890 to 1900, Sorolla's paintings were seen in all the leading European salons. He painted 500 works for his first one-man show at the Galeries Georges Petit in Paris in 1906, quickly followed by exhibitions in Berlin (1907), London (1908), New York (1909), Chicago, and St Louis (1909). His early works such as Sad Inheritance (1899; Valencia, Caja de Ahorros de Valencia) were influenced by the art of Jules Bastien-Lepage and Adolphe von Menzel as well as by the social realism championed by his friend the novelist Vicente Blasco Ibáñez. Although these paintings made him well known, Sorolla later found the subjects sentimental. Indeed, his reputation would rest instead with his renderings of Valencia's Mediterranean shore. Painting out of doors, Sorolla vividly captured the sparkling blues of the water and golden sunlight in works such as The Return from Fishing (1894; Paris, Musée d'Orsay). From 1911 to 1919 Sorolla worked on the immense depictions of the landscape, costumes, and popular traditions of the unique regions of Spain commissioned by Archer M.Huntington for the Hispanic Society of America in New York (in situ). Sorolla also had a successful career as a portraitist; his distinguished sitters included King Alfonso XIII of Spain (1907; Madrid, Palacio Real) and American President Taft (1909; Cincinnati, Taft Mus.).
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    Louis Comfort Tiffany
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    The Rivalry Between Louis Comfort Tiffany and John La Farge

    In the last two decades of the nineteenth century in America, the introduction of opalescent glass revolutionized the thousand-year-old art of stained glass. Opalescent glass has a milky opacity created by the suspension of particles that reflect and scatter light. While the material had been in use for tableware - glasses, pitchers, vases, toiletries, boxes - for decades, it had never before been made into flat sheets for use in windows. Beginning in 1879, its application to windows created an immensely popular decorating sensation within a few years. Pre-eminence in this market spelled material success, and the competition for clientele quickly became a pitched battle between the two artists who first introduced the material: Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933), a young sometime painter and respected decorator (Fig. 1), and John La Farge (1835 1910), an accomplished easel painter and illustrator recently turned successful muralist (Fig. 2). During their lifetimes, their antipathy for one another was bitter and their competition for the stained glass market was fierce, an indication of the value and importance that stained glass acquired during this period.1

    Fig. 1. Louis Comfort Tiffany, by Pach. Courtesy of New-York Historical Society.

    Fig. 2. John La Farge in his Studio, c. 1895. J. Walker MeSpadden, Famous Painters of America (New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1907), opposite 194. Courtesy of Dr. James L. Yarnall.

    By the mid-1890s, the issue between these two great artists had become one of seniority: which of them had first introduced opalescent glass in stained glass windows? The question has remained to this day, with every succeeding generation of books and articles on each artist claiming pride of invention. But historical research provides the answer, along with the reason for the question in the first place. Hubris, financial and social disaster, opportunism, and ultimately market share are in large part the explanation.

    Prior to 1882, relations between the two artists were not acrimonious. Writing many years later, La Farge related that Tiffany had visited him in the 1870s. La Farge had willingly shown him his experiments with opalescent glass and plating (the layering of one piece over another to achieve colors or effects), clearly establishing that it was he who introduced Tiffany to the material.2 If we accept La Farge's recollections that he and Tiffany were on apparently good terms at that time, friendly enough for La Farge to show the young artist his work, clearly something went wrong after that.

    There is evidence of what appears to have been a legal dispute of major proportions between Tiffany and La Farge in the early 1880s. References to lawsuits lurk in La Farge's correspondence as well as in letters and reminiscences of others. The details, however, have not come to light, never having reached any public forum such as a court or the newspapers, and only being hinted at by the parties many years later. It seems to have centered on the rights of either artist to claim precedence and exclusivity in the use of opalescent glass in windows through their patents for it. The fact that the two artists were so fiercely opposed to one another for thirty years, to the exclusion of all other opalescent glass artists, is explained by their apparently unresolved argument.

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    Tiffany, Louis Comfort

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  • Edgar Degas Paintings (569)
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  • Abstract (388)
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    cuore della collana di tiffany
    tiffany veske
    ティフィー
    tiffany pop
    louis comfort tiffany

    The Rivalry Between Louis Comfort Tiffany and John La Farge

    In the last two decades of the nineteenth century in America, the introduction of opalescent glass revolutionized the thousand-year-old art of stained glass. Opalescent glass has a milky opacity created by the suspension of particles that reflect and scatter light. While the material had been in use for tableware - glasses, pitchers, vases, toiletries, boxes - for decades, it had never before been made into flat sheets for use in windows. Beginning in 1879, its application to windows created an immensely popular decorating sensation within a few years. Pre-eminence in this market spelled material success, and the competition for clientele quickly became a pitched battle between the two artists who first introduced the material: Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933), a young sometime painter and respected decorator (Fig. 1), and John La Farge (1835 1910), an accomplished easel painter and illustrator recently turned successful muralist (Fig. 2). During their lifetimes, their antipathy for one another was bitter and their competition for the stained glass market was fierce, an indication of the value and importance that stained glass a@Tu,u,uI Louis Comfort Tiffany - Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida Paintings

    Louis Comfort Tiffany - Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida Paintings

    • Louis Comfort Tiffany

    • Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida
    • 20 X 24 in
    • $159.95
    • 24 X 36 in
    • $268.95
    • 30 X 40 in
    • $361.95
    • 36 X 48 in
    • $476.95
    • 48 X 72 in
    • $962.95
    Prev Los Picos Tower Lucrecia Arana Next
    addthis
    Email Page to Friend
    Add to Wish List Add to Wish List
    Would you like to publicly share your opinion of this painting?
    Be the first to critique this painting.

    Other paintings by Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida:

    Los Palangreros
    Los Palangreros
    Los Picos Tower
    Los Picos Tower