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Information Regarding Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Wed Dec 19, 2012 3:22 pm

A biography of Henry Abiram Spaulding of Spaulding & Co. of Chicago and Paris, written in 1894:


HENRY ABIRAM SPAULDING


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If there is any art in which all the dross is worn away and by refining process the full beauty of every truth of the material world is made to stand before the eyes of men, it is the art of the jeweler. Beauty is God's trademark, proving His handiwork, and the craft of the jeweler, utilizing all the resources of fine stones and ores for the adornment of common life, is in line with divine methods. While the ancients reserved beauty for picture, or statue or temple, the art of the jeweler has helped to distribute it upon the articles of common life, sprinkling it o'er the table, altar or mantelpiece, making all utensils of food and drink become ministers of the highest forms of beauty. In the museums of Europe and this country jewels of various nations are among the most interesting and instructive collections. They afford the data for the study of the customs of races long since passed away, leaving behind them frequently no fuller record of their existence than such as is contained in these collections of their appliances for personal decoration. From the polished and engraved bones of the lake dwellers up to the quaint but exquisitely worked jewelry of the Etruscans, the Romans and the Byzantians, the gradual growth of the art can be traced step by step, and the different national characteristics of the various peoples can be studied as accurately as in their architecture or any other records of their culture which have come down to us. While the business of the honest jeweler preaches a sermon of truth in its very elements, there are spurious jewelers, who by dealing in spurious jewels, teach a lesson of deceit and false pretense. The jeweler should be a gem in himself, resplendent among his fellow-men for his innate probity and the honesty of his representations. He should, above all, know his art to perfection, lest he deceive through being himself deceived. The profession, for such it truly is, demands a large share of the taste of the artist, the breadth and knowledge of the man of science, and the activity and acuteness of the man of affairs; indeed, it is doubtful if there is any other calling demanding so much technical information, such strict familiarity with a wide realm of objects or so much refined and experienced taste as must be possessed by the head of such a business. There are many experts in gems and jewels, both in this country and throughout the Old World, but in Henry Abiram Spaulding, head of the celebrated house of Spaulding & Co., Chicago possesses one whose opportunities to inform himself almost infallibly in all departments of the lore of the jeweler's art have not been surpassed by those of any other connoisseur in the Old World or the New; and, as few men have had more to do with the extension of the American jewelry trade in foreign lands than Mr. Spaulding, his career has attracted the widest notice and comment, and is one which must prove exceptionally interesting, not only to the student of international commerce, but especially to citizens of Chicago who desire to know something of their most successful contemporary.

Mr. Spaulding is not only a jeweler, but the son of a jeweler. His father, however, abandoned the jewelry trade, and, following the bent of a mind naturally scientific, took up the profession of medicine, and became a physician of skill and prominence. New York City was the place of Mr. Spaulding's nativity, and he was born November 11,1837, to Dr. Abiram and Julia A. (Thornton) Spaulding. Dr. Spaulding was of the sixth generation of Spauldings in America, counting from Edward, the founder of the branch of the family to which Henry Abiram Spaulding belongs. The name Spaulding appears quite early in English history, and the name, as a patronymic, is on the Continent as well as in Great Britain. The Spauldings of America, except a few who have recently emigrated to this country, are all descendants from three ancient families, one of which, with whom this sketch has most to do, settled in Massachusetts, a second in Maryland and a third in Georgia.

Edward Spaulding, the first of the name of whom we have any knowledge, came to America in the earliest years of the Massachusetts colony, probably between 1630 and 1633. He was made a freeman in 1640. In 1652-55 he was prominent in connection with the laying out and incorporation of Chelmsford, Mass. He was one of the proprietors of the “New Field," which was included in an addition made to the town plan in 1656, but which was not fenced and so named until 1669. Others of the family were conspicuous in connection with the primitive history of this old town. He was twice married, and died in 1670. His youngest child, Andrew, was born in 1652, and under his father's will succeeded to the paternal estate. He was chosen deacon of the church and held that office at the time of his death, which occurred in 1713. Andrew, his eldest son and second child, was born in 1678. He lived in Chelmsford, and was a deacon in the church, and otherwise prominent. He died in 1753. James, his ninth child and seventh son, was born in Chelmsford in 1714, and settled at Westford. He removed to New Ipswich, N. H., but after a few years returned to Westford, where he died about 1790. Silas, the sixth son, and eleventh child of James, was born at Westford, Mass., in 1757, and died at Fort Ann, N. Y., in 1812. He was a soldier of the Revolution, and was at the battle of Bennington, Vt.,and at the surrender of Burgoyne, and in the engagements which preceded it. After the war he married Hannah Brown and settled at Granville, N. Y., whence he removed to Fort Ann. His youngest child, Dr. Abiram Spaulding, father of Henry Abiram Spaulding, was born at Fort Ann, N. Y., May 9, 1807. He had two sons and four daughters, of whom the immediate subject of this sketch was the fourth in order of birth. He died December, 1887, at Aurora, Ill.

Henry Abiram Spaulding first saw Chicago in 1848, when he came West with his father's family, journeying by water from New York, and consuming on the trip fully a month. The family located in Aurora, Ill., where the elder Spaulding engaged in the jewelry trade. Six years later, when he was seventeen, and had acquired considerable education and no little knowledge of the jewelry and general business, young Spaulding accepted a position offered him in the old-time dry goods store of Olmstead & Co., on Lake Street, opposite the little old store of Potter Palmer, where the afterward merchant prince conducted a small business somewhat on the plan of the country village storekeeper of to-day. That was in 1854, the year of the opening of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, and Mr. Spaulding made the journey from Aurora to Chicago as a passenger on the first locomotive that ever ran over that line between the two cities. It was vastly different from the improved engines of to-day, but it fulfilled its mission and was a wonder to all who beheld it for the first time; and, indeed, the railroad itself was a rude affair, consisting of “ stringers " laid on sleepers, and surmounted by “ strap " rail, and the experiences on the old “Q" road with “ strap" rail were no less dangerous and amusing than those on other lines of similar construction. Mr. Spaulding's next employment was with the dry goods house of Williams, Case & Rhodes, which was swept away in the panic of 1857. This disaster did not seriously inconvenience him, however, and it may have been a blessing in disguise, for he was offered and accepted a place in the great New York establishment of Ball, Black & Co., at that time one of the world's famous jewelry houses. There he was afforded exceptional opportunity to acquire a knowledge of gems and jewels, which he perfected in his subsequent experience. His connection with this house continued until 1864, when he engaged in the jewelry trade for himself, in New York, as a member of the firm of Browne & Spaulding, which was in existence until 1871.

Attracted by his success, the celebrated house of Tiffany & Co. made him a most flattering proposition to become its general representative in Europe; and in 1871 he entered upon a memorably successful career with this establishment, which resulted in the bestowal upon it of prestige such as no other American house ever had, and ended only when Mr. Spaulding engaged in his present enterprise in Chicago. During the whole period of, his connection with Tiffany & Co. Mr. Spaulding had headquarters in Paris, France. Probably no other man, certainly no other American, has had such an opportunity as was his to examine the world's famous gems. He went to Europe with letters of the highest commendation from Gen. Grant, Vice-President Schuyler Colfax, Chief Justice Waite, and others no less distinguished; and an acquaintance with the Prince of Wales, formed during the visit of the heir-apparent to this country in 1860, enabled him to visit all the royal families of Europe, with the heads and principal members of which he had personal interviews. His acquaintance with these distinguished personages, thus auspiciously formed, enabled him to inspect all the priceless crown jewels of the Old World, as well as all the rare gems and jewels owned by different members of the several royal households. Among the large and costly jewels submitted to him were some with most interesting histories, notably the following: "The Regent," the largest of the crown jewels of France, required two years in cutting. It was found at Parteal, and weighs 410 carats. It was bought by the Regent of France, in 1717, for 12,000,000 francs. A slave is said to have stolen it, and hidden it in an incision made for the purpose in his thigh. It was afterward found and returned, and adorned the crown of Louis XV. “The Orloff," belonging to the Russian crown, weighs 194 1/4 carats, and cost $450,000, and a life pension of $4,000 annually. “The Florentine," the richest jewel of the crown collection of Austria, weighing 139 1/2 carats, is valued at $105,000. “The Hassac," owned by the Duke of Westminster, weighs 79 1/4 carats, and is valued at $30,000. “ The L’igott," owned by a London jeweler, weighs 82 1/4 carats, and is worth $150,o00. “The Tiffany Stone," belonging to Tiffany 8: Co., weighs 125 1/2 carats. He was shown a sapphire and diamond brooch belonging to Czar of Russia, and valued at $800,000. The richest sapphire was 2 1/4 inches in diameter, and was surrounded by diamonds each as large as a hazel nut.

It is doubtful if any other American ever made so extensive a tour of the Old World and met so many of its dignitaries and so many representatives of its royalty, and no man traveling in the Old World without official prestige ever had conferred upon him so much honor by men and women who rarely condescend to meet representatives of commercial interests under any circumstances. At Sandringham Hall, Mr. Spaulding had the honor, after an interview with the Prince and Princess of Wales, during which he consented to supply certain costly jewelry, of being presented with game shot by the Prince and other valuable mementoes of the occasion which were dispatched to London for him. He also was specially invited to afternoon tea to Lady Paget's house, where he met some most notable members of the peerage and attachies of the Court, as well as the ambassadors from the principal foreign powers, among whom were the Duc de Repulo, Comte Zeweske, the Baron Tefferbrieck and Prince Biron de Courlude. His visit to Queen Victoria at Windsor Castle was also most memorable. Sir Henry Ponsonby, the Queen's Equerry, presented Mr. Spaulding with admission to the dais on the occasion of the general ceremonial opening of court, in appreciation of the satisfaction Mr. Spaulding had given the royal family in the matter of the finest jewelry. He was treated with equal distinction at other European courts. During his residence in Paris, he was frequently dined by Vice-President Morton, then minister to France. Upon all the important occasions during that period. he was one of the distinguished guests, notably at the inauguration ceremony of Bartholdi's statue of “ Liberty Enlightening the World." Thereafter in New York a special place was reserved to all those who were present at the Paris inauguration to witness the re-inauguration in America. As a proof of the confidence reposed in him by our ambassadors to foreign parts, with whom his relations were always most cordial, he was entrusted on nearly every one of his return voyages from the different capitals of Europe, with special dispatches to the government. The handsome certificates of the “ Bearer of Dispatches" form a very interesting feature of the large correspondence incident to that remarkable period of activity and diligence. Among his most constant correspondents at that time were Chief Justice Waite, Vice-President Colfax, Secretary Babcock, Hon. Samuel S. (“Sunset") Cox, and others equally eminent. Mr. Spaulding was successful in making arrangements which resulted in the appointment of Tiffany & Co. as gold and silversmiths to Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen of England, His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, Her Royal Highness the Princess of \Vales, His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, Their Imperial Majesties the Emperor and Empress of Russia, His Imperial Highness the Grand Duke Valdimir, His Imperial Highness the Grand Duke Alexis, His Imperial Highness the Grand Duke Paul, His Imperial Highness the Grand Duke Sergius, His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Austria, His Majesty the King of Prussia, His Majesty the King of the Belgians, His Majesty the King of Italy, His Majesty the King of Denmark, His Majesty the King of Spain, His Majesty the King of Portugal, the Khedive of Egypt, and His Imperial Majesty the Shah of Persia, as well as to the Emperor of Brazil; and the house had conferred upon it the gold medal “ Proemia Digno," from the Emperor of Russia, in 1883, and the Grand Prix and Legion of Honor, Paris, in 1879.

Having a full appreciation of the artistic side of his calling, Mr. Spaulding's idea was and is to promote the taste for the beautiful and refined in the precious metals and the costly stones in that city in which he had his first noteworthy business experience, and in whose great future he always had the most unbounded faith, and in 1888 he determined, after quite extensive correspondence with prominent Chicagoans who favored the idea most enthusiastically, among them Levi Z. Leiter and George M. Pullman, to embark in his present enterprise in this city, but not until his loyalty to the house Tiffany & Co. had led him to exhaust every argument and device of persuasion in an attempt to induce that company to open a branch here. Many were the regrets of Mr. Tiffany, who fully appreciated Mr. Spaulding's great achievements in behalf of his house, but Mr. Spaulding felt that he had a most important mission, and finally telegraphed from Paris his determination to relinquish his connection with the New York firm and enter upon the great field in the West. The house of Spaulding & Co., at State and Jackson Streets, Chicago, and 36 Avenue de l'Opera, Paris, France, was established and incorporated that year. It has a paid-up capital of $500,000, and its officers are Henry A. Spaulding, president: Edward Forman, secretary, and Lloyd Milner, treasurer. It does a general business as gold and silversmiths, and manufactures extensively. occupying four floors, each 147 x 40 feet in area, as salesrooms, and a third for its manufacturing department, and employs in all its branches from eighty to one hundred persons. The associates of Mr. Spaulding are men of business ability and experience, and each is thoroughly informed in the special departments of the important business of the house to which, by a natural division of labor, he devotes his attention.

In less than five years “ Spaulding's" has been made to Chicago what “ Tiffany's" is to New York, and it is doubtful if any other business establishment in the city attracts so many visitors who come, not especially to buy, but to see the unique and magnificent display of beautiful things there silently but surely doing their part in the great work of human refinement, for which the age in which we live is wonderful above all that have preceded it. Every day adds to this rich treasure house, and visitors to Chicago will find here a display of rare gems, ornaments and jewelry second only to that of Tiffany & Co. The Parisian branch of Spaulding & Co. is the most conspicuous American addition to that city in the way of adornment and trade. The show-rooms beneath the chambers of the American Consulate are handsomely decorated in white and gold. The enthusiasm of the Parisians is especially awakened by the “Evening Room," draped in black velvet, and in other respects very like the "Gem Boudoir" of the Chicago house. Chicago is benefited by the Paris branch in that it enables Spaulding & Co. to secure for the Chicago establishment every Parisian novelty directly it appears, and very many such novelties and precious objects of art, are received by every steamer. It is a fact of much significance in this connection that within four to six days' journey from Chicago are to be found quite plentifully not only gold and silver and the richest and most beautifully colored marbles, but sapphires, spinel rubies, topaz, smoked topaz, and other gems, while such stones as must necessarily be imported are as easily accessible to Chicagoans as to jewelers on either coast. This, taken in consideration with the city's great and growing trade in gems and jewels and all their kindred articles, must indicate that the day is rapidly approaching when Chicago will be the center of this trade for the American continent.

Mr. Spaulding was married December 17, 1874, to Miss Cornelia Russell, of New York City, daughter of J. G. Russell, who was one of the pioneers in commercial navigation and was one of the proprietors of the Black Ball line of boats, in use long before the introduction of steamers. To Mr. and Mrs. Spaulding have been born two children named Russell and Marguerite. In social life Mr. Spaulding has been prominent, but he really cares little for society, in the ordinary sense, and the attractions of his own fireside are too strong to admit of his becoming a man of the world, as the term is usually understood. He is a member of the Stanley Club of Paris, and has long been identified with the Chicago Club, of this city. but he often says, when speaking of this fact, that to him “home is the best club of all." He is recognized as a typical American and as a fit representative of the great State of Illinois. as was demonstrated when he was appointed commissioner for Illinois at the World‘s Exposition, at Paris, in 1889. His report, when his duties were terminated by the close of the exposition, embraced facts of the greatest importance to the general public, and for that reason it was given to the press by Gov. Fifer, who wrote Mr. Spaulding, commending it in the highest terms. In all things Mr. Spaulding is an enthusiastic Chicagoan, proud of the city, and doing it honor, not alone in the high character he gives to his branch of trade, but in every other way possible to a progressive and patriotic citizen. , He has watched its growth almost from a country village, and during all the years since he first saw it, his faith in its future has never wavered. He believed years ago, as he believes now, in a destiny that proclaimed it the future metropolis of a continent, and in the full vigor of his business life, he beholds it, in many respects, the greatest city in the world.

Source: Industrial Chicago - Volume 4 - 1894

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Fri Dec 21, 2012 9:57 am

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago and Paris - 1914

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago and Paris - 1922

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Fri Feb 08, 2013 4:33 am

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago and Paris - 1918

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Wed Dec 10, 2014 7:42 am

G. E. Throop, a gentleman from New York new to the jewelry trade. has been engaged to occupy a managerial position with Spaulding & Co. He will assist Mr. Milnor, president of the house, in the multiplicity of duties which devolve upon him –a position, in general, similar to that formerly occupied by Mr. Foreman. Mr. Throop has already taken hold.

Source: The Jewelers' Review - 12th April 1899

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Wed Dec 24, 2014 11:16 am

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago - 1913

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Sun Jan 04, 2015 1:54 pm

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago - 1903

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Thu Jun 18, 2015 6:51 am

William Poetterches, a jewelry designer, employed by Spaulding & Co., and his two sons, aged 15 and 17, narrowly escaped drowning Sunday, Oct. 10, when a motor boat in which they were riding about a mile off shore shipped water and sank. The boat was simply a steel rowboat with a motor attached to the rear. The shallow craft became caught in the troughs and shipped water. Suddenly it sank. The trio struggled in vain for some minutes, as none of them could swim. Capt. Thomas Levy, skipper of the Mayflower, a power cruiser, happening upon the scene, saw Mr. Poetterches and his two sons struggling in the water. Immediately he tied a rope about his waist and, with two men holding on to the other end, he plunged into the heavy sea. The youngest boy was sinking, and the skipper took him aboard the cruiser first. He then rescued the other boy. Poetterches is said to have been in a very weakened condition when Captain Levy finally reached him.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 20th October 1920

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Sun Jun 21, 2015 7:09 am

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago - 1906

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Fri Jul 03, 2015 1:47 pm

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Spaulding & Co. - Paris and Chicago - 1894

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Postby dognose » Mon Jul 06, 2015 3:45 am

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago - 1915

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Wed Sep 23, 2015 1:39 pm

A Madman Breaks Spaulding & Co.'s Window and Grabs a Silver Pitcher

Chicago, Ill., Nov. 19. While the crowds of shoppers were making their way along State St. yesterday afternoon a wild eyed man detached himself from the throng at State St. and Jackson Boulevard and, walking over to the large show window to the right of the street entrance to Spaulding & Co.'s jewelry store, proceeded to gain access to the wares displayed by breaking the glass with the butt of a huge revolver. The sight of the weapon caused a panic in the crowd, but the would-be robber kept at his work until the plate gave way. Then, seizing a large silver pitcher, he ran toward the Jackson Boulevard crossing. But his moments of freedom were numbered. Louis Alrutz, the firm's doorman, and Martin Douce, an ex-policeman, who is now acting as a porter for the firm, were witnesses of the theft and managed to capture the man before he could mix with the crowd and make his escape.

At the station the prisoner gave the name of Thomas Smith and the place of his birth as New Jersey. He had come to Chicago, according to his statement, only a few hours before the commission of the act. Upon being searched by the officers at the station, he was found to have upon his person the sum of $175 in cash, railroad tickets from Chicago to San Francisco, to Kansas City and to St. Louis, and a commutation ticket upon one of the suburban railroads in the last named city. He is of average height, of blonde complexion, and wears the garments and has the general appearance of a workingman in comfortable circumstances. When asked for his motive in committing the act of burglary, Smith said that he was ordered by pursuing spirits to shoot, stab and destroy. These, he added, were ever near him and persistently whispered into his ears. Upon receiving this information the lieutenant at the station left an order for the city physician to examine the prisoner for his sanity.

The display of silverware so rudely disturbed by Smith was removed and a new glass quickly put into place. With the arrival of workman upon the scene the crowd that had gathered dispersed. Within the store there had been but little tumult. The whole affair had passed so quickly and so quietly that but a few knew of it until it was all over. As the pitcher was recovered there was no loss other than the plate glass window.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 23rd November 1898

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Mon Sep 28, 2015 5:42 am

C. S. Hannan, of Spaulding & Co., expects to sail for Europe about the 10th of July, to be gone through the summer. Mrs. Hannan will accompany him.

Source: The Jewelers Review - 21st June 1899

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Thu Oct 01, 2015 12:06 pm

CHICAGO

Mr. Moore, of Spaulding & Co., was kept away from his work last week by a dangerous and very painful abscess on his right hand. The trouble came from scratching a mosquito bite, and for a time blood poisoning was feared. Mr. Moore has suffered a great deal.


Source: The Jewelers Review - 28th June 1899

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Sun Oct 11, 2015 3:55 am

Messrs. Spaulding & Co. have issued an attractive catalogue of their "Treasures from Spain" collection. The booklet is tastefully printed on rough deckle edged paper, and is resplendent with a bright yellow cover.

Source: The Jewelers Review - 12th April 1899

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Wed Oct 28, 2015 5:19 am

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Spaulding & Cie. - Paris - 1901

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Fri Nov 06, 2015 5:21 am

CHICAGO

Lloyd Milnar, president of Spaulding & Co., returned from the East last week.

W. H. Harb, of Spaulding & Co., is on his vacation. He is in Kansas City.

C. S. Hannan, of Spaulding & Co., expects to sail for Europe about the 10th of July, to be gone through the summer. Mrs. Hannan will accompany him.


Source: The Jewelers Review - 21st June 1899

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Sat Nov 07, 2015 6:18 am

Fred M. Lund of Spaulding & Co., has been appointed supervisor for the Horological Institute of America in the Chicago district. The selection of Mr. Lund for this post is a distinction, inasmuch as the Horological Institute of America is an important scientific body formed under governmental auspices to encourage the study of watchmaking and watch repairing and thereby relieve the great shortage of men skilled in these fine mechanical branches, which is one of the present problems of the watch industry. The district supervisor will have charge of certain phases of the work of certifying watchmakers according to their degree of skill, so that the institute may issue certificates showing which ones are competent to make repairs to watches and clocks of the community.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 11th October 1922

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Postby dognose » Wed Nov 11, 2015 5:55 am

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Spaulding & Co. - Chicago - 1912

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Postby dognose » Sat Nov 14, 2015 7:33 am

Sec'y Forman. of the Spaulding Co., and Geo. W. Prentiss, Chicago manager of the Gorham Mfg. Co., returned from the East last week. They both visited the Gorham Co.'s factory in Providence, spent some time in the metropolis, and Mr. Forman finished up his trip by going to Washington for a few days.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 16th September 1891

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Re: Henry Abiram Spaulding - Spaulding & Co. - Chicago

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Postby dognose » Wed Nov 18, 2015 6:13 am

"We are selling a larger proportion of fine goods than of the smaller, compared with previous years," says Manager Forman, of Spaulding & Co. Diamond goods and fine silver wares are prominent in the sales of this house.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 12th December 1894

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The Greenwich Police Department is collecting donations of non-perishable food and supplies to support victims of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. through Tuesday at 11 Bruce Place. For more information on donations, contact Aixa Capozza at 203-249-4777.

Church tag sale

St. Paul Lutheran Church, 286 Delevan Ave., Byram, will hold its church tag sale from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday in the front circle; 40 tables of yard goods, furniture, clothing, children’s items. Parking available on William Street West.

Color Challenge Run and Obstacle Course

The International School at Dundee will host its first Greenwich Color Challenge Run and Obstacle Course at 9 a.m. Saturday starting at 55 Florence Road. Participation costs $40. Register online at GreenwichColorChallenge.com through Oct 5. All Greenwich schools have a discount code. Proceeds benefit PTA-sponsored curriculum enhancements at ISD.

Dog adoption event

Raleigh and Co. has teamed with Suzy Armstrong, a town real estate agent with Coldwell Banker, State Rep. Fred Camillo, Nicole Gallagher of Murphy’s Paw and Sarah Bamford of Hybrid Media will hold a dog adoption event from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at the high-end pet good retailer, 209 Bruce Park Ave. Raleigh and Co. will donate a portion of the day’s sales to Murphy’s Paw dog rescue; raffles; petition to extend dog access to Tod’s Point Park during fall and winter will be available. For more information or to donate, visit Murphy's Paw Rescue on Facebook (www.facebook.com/murphyspawstratford) or email Nicole (nicole@murphyspaw.org).

Jerusalem before David

Peter Feinman, president of the Westchester chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America, will discuss “Jerusalem Before David” at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Byram Schubert Library, Mead Avenue. The lecture, sponsored by the Archaeological Associates of Greenwich, is free and open to the public. Copies of his book, “Jerusalem Throne Games: The Battle of Bible Stories After the Death of David,” will be available at the library.

Outdoor Arts Festival

The 36th Bruce Museum Outdoor Arts Festival, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday , will feature more than 85 new and returning artists from across the country. The juried works include painting on canvas, board and paper, mixed media in 2D and 3D, drawings and graphics. At the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive. Festival admission is $10.

Solo show

Greenwich Art Society member Karen Griffin will have a solo show, “Navigating the Art World,” at the Greenwich Art Society Gallery, 299 Greenwich Ave., through Sunday. Public reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday .

Dazzling Dahlias Show

The Garden Education Center hosts the 2017 Dazzling Dahlias Show from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday at 130 Bible St. Admission is free.

Fire Prevention Week activities

The Greenwich Volunteer Firefighters Association will celebrate Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 8 through 14, with a flag-raising ceremony at 9 a.m. Sunday at town hall and the Greenwich Fire Department will host a series of open houses: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 15 at the Glenville firehouse; noon to 4 p.m. Oct. 22 at Round Hill firehouse and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 29 at Sound Beach firehouse. To learn more about Fire Prevention Week, visit http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/fire-prevention-week. To learn more about becoming a volunteer firefighter and joining the Greenwich Fire Department, visit www.greenwichct.org or contact Brian M. Kelly at 203-618-8877 or BKelly@greenwichctg.org .

Fall Fest

The Greenwich Historical Society’s Fall Fest is set for 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Sunday in the Bush-Holley Historic Site, 39 Strickland Road, Cos Cob. Meet and greet and walkaround with Grover from Sesame Street, touch a truck, food truck, tours of the Bush-Holley House, puppet show, scarecrow competition. $25 family, $10 adults, $5 children younger than 18, free children younger than 3. Separate fee for scarecrow competition: members $10, non-members $15.

Hensons on display

An exhibit featuring “Jim and Jane Henson: Creative Work, Creative Play,” will be on display at the Greenwich Historical Society’s Storehouse Gallery, 39 Strickland Road, Cos Cob, through Sunday. The exhibit is part of several events to focus on the Hensons, who were known for their love of art and puppets. Upcoming events include an evening with Cheryl Henson, a screening of Jim Henson’s commercials, a history puppet slam and family programs. For more information, visit www.greenwichhistory.org or call 203-869-6899.

Off Sounders Openings

The Off Sounders, Greenwich’s all-male a cappella group, is looking for a few new singers in all vocal parts. The group has a 60-year history of performing at local clubs, private parties, benefits and holiday parties. Men who might be interested in joining are welcome to visit a rehearsal at 8 p.m. Monday at the First Congregational Church, 108 Sound Beach Ave., to see if they want to audition. Email Inbox13@gmail.com for more information.

Candidate Events

The League of Women Voters of Greenwich will hold a series of candidate events, beginning with a board of education forum from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday at Greenwich High School’s MISA Auditorium, 10 Hillside Road. From 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Oct. 11, a second board of education forum will be held at Hamilton Avenue School, 184 Hamilton Ave. A board of selectmen forum will take place from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Oct. 17 at Round Hill Community House, 397 Round Hill Road. From 7 to 8 p.m. Oct. 24, Town Hall’s meeting room will host a tax collector forum at 101 Field Point Road, and there will be an RTM meet and greet from 3 to 5 p.m. Oct 29 at Central Middle School, 9 Indian Rock Lane. All events are free and open to the public. For more information, call Jara Burnett at 203-637-9244.

Art Lecture on Toulouse-Lautrec

Dr. Jay Clarke, Manton curator of prints, drawings and photographs at the Clark Institute, will consider how the culture of celebrity fueled the work of artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec’s work. The galleries will open for a reception at 6 p.m. and the lecture willstart at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive. Register online at brucemuseum.org/site/events by Oct. 9. The talk is free for members and $15 for nonmembers who sign up in advance. At the door, admission is $10 for members and $25 for nonmembers.

Retirement Planning

Betsy Gillam, retired senior vice president of AARP Research, will discuss the reality and practicality of retirement at “Retirement - What’s Next: Plan, Dream, Watch the Grass Grow” at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the YMCA, 139 E. Putnam Ave. The program is free. RSVP at 203-422-2342.

Chair yoga

Friends of the Cos Cob Library are holding a chair yoga event from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at the library, 5 Sinawoy Road. Free, no reservation required. Wear comfortable clothes.

Author talk

The Garden Education Center, 130 Bible St., Cos Cob, presents an evening with author Andrea Wulf at 7 p.m. Tuesday . Wulf is the author of “The Founding Gardeners.” GEC members free, non-members $20. Advanced registration required. Call 203-869-9242 for information.

“Breathe” screening

Greenwich International Film Festival will host an early screening of “Breathe,” featuring Andrew Garfield and Claire Foy, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Bow Tie Criterion Cinemas, 2 Railroad Ave. Doors open at 7 p.m. All proceeds will benefit the Breast Cancer Alliance. Tickets are available for a $25 donation at greenwichfilm.org.

Life of a Conductor

David Gilbert, conductor of the Greenwich Symphony, will discuss "Nourishing the Great Trees: the Life of a Conductor" at the Wednesday meeting of the Retired Men’s Association of Greenwich. Doors open at 10:40 a.m., discussion at 11 a.m. at First Presbyterian Church, Lafayette Place. Free and open to the public.

Mohamad Hafez: Homeland InSecurity

Unable to return to his native Syria while an architecture student in rural Iowa, Hafez began creating miniature models of his homeland. His pieces will be on display from Wednesday through Dec. 12 at the Luchsinger Gallery at Greenwich Academy, 200 N. Maple Ave. There will be an artist’s reception from 6 to 8 p.m. on Oct. 11 that is open to the public.

YWCA candlelight vigil

YWCA Greenwich will host a candlelight vigil at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at 259 E. Putnam Ave. Greenwich High School football coach John Marinelli will receive the Purple Ribbon Award for his commitment to raising awareness about teen dating violence. For more information, visit ywcagreenwich.org.

Brew Ha-Ha

Greenwich United Way’s third annual Brew Ha-Ha is set for 6 p.m. Oct. 13 at the Arch Street Teen Center, 100 Arch St., with comedian Jane Condon in her second year as emcee. Fund-raiser features Andy Pitz and Michele Balan. Live auction. Proceeds to benefit United Way programs. Tickets now on sale, sponsorships available. For information, email Greenwich United Way Director of Development Jeremy Nappi at info@greenwichunitedway.org or call 203-869-2221.

Friday movies

The Greenwich Library, 101 W. Putnam Ave., continues its 8 p.m. Friday art feature movie season with “La La Land” on Oct. 13; “The Searchers” on Oct. 20; “Cameraperson” on Oct. 27; “Jackie” on Nov. 3; “Manchester by the Sea’ on Nov. 10; “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week” on Nov. 17, “Cezanne and I, Dec. 1; “A Man Called Ove” Dec. 8; “A Midwinter’s Tale,” Dec. 15; “Hidden Figures” Jan. 5; “Florence Foster Jenkins” Jan. 12; “The Search,” Jan. 19; “Rope,” Jan. 26; “Funny Face” Feb. 2; “Belle,” Feb. 9; “Loving,” Feb. 16; “Fences,” Feb. 23; “The Eagle Huntress,” March 2; “Patterson,” March 9; “The Sicilian Clan,” March 16; “A Plastic Ocean” March 23; “Say Anything,” April 6; “Suffragette,” April 13; “Angels in the Outfield,” April 20; “Paris Can Wait,” April 27; “Art Bastard” May 4; “Gifted,” May 11; “Ali and Nino,” May 18; “Louise by the Shore,” June 8; “Toni Erdmann,” June 15; “Irrational Man,” June 22 and “Cinema Paradiso,” June 29. All films are free and open to the public. Doors open at 7:40 p.m. The series is made possible by contriburions from Friends of Greenwich Library.

Ballet class

Cos Cob Library, 5 Sinawoy Road, will feature Greenwich Dance Studio from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Oct. 13 in the Community Room. The class is intended for pre-schoolers, ages 3-5. Online registration is required at greenwichlibrary.evanced.info/signup/calendar. For more information, call the library at 203-622-6883.

Zumba for tweens

Cos Cob Library, 5 Sinawoy Road, will host a tween zumba class with instructor Sarah Meyers from 4 to 5 p.m. Oct. 13 in the Cos Cob Community Room. The class is intended for 10- to 14-year-olds. Space is limited; register at the library or call 203-622-6883.

Emotional Life of Flowers

Artist, photographer and former newspaper columnist Lee Paine will present a solo exhibit of flower images in the Gallery of the Garden Education Center of Greenwich in October. “The Emotional Life of Flowers: Dahlias and Friends” will be on display through Oct. 27, with a reception from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Oct. 14 at the Garden Education Center, 130 Bible St. For weekday visits between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., call ahead at 203-89-9242 to make sure the gallery is open.

Polyphony String Quartet

The First Presbyterian Church of Greenwich will host a benefit concert featuring a string quartet of Polyphony Foundation students from Israel, followed by a discussion with Polyphony Foundation’s co-founder Nabeel Abboud-Ashkar. The concert will take place from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Oct. 14 at the church, 1 W. Putnam Ave.

Town-wide cleanup

Greenwich Green and Clean’s town-wide cleanup will be held from 8 a.m. to noon Oct. 14. Bags and gloves can be picked up at any fire house. Litter collected at Greenwich Point will be tallied for the international coastal inventory. Community service certificates and refreshments are available. Call 203-531-0006 for information on how to volunteer.

Cos Cob Chili Cook Off

The Cos Cob Chili Cook Off will take place from 3 to 6 p.m. Oct. 14 at Diamond Hill United Methodist Church, 521 E. Putnam Ave. There is a $10 fee to taste and judge chili; entry into the competition is free. All proceeds benefit the Neighbor to Neighbor Food Bank. For more information, call 203-869-2395 or visit diamondhilumc.com.

Math marathon

Cos Cob Library, 5 Sinawoy Road, will hold a math marathon for children to compete in math games. The top three winners will get a prize. The contest will be held from 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. for grades 1-3 and from 3:50 to 4:50 p.m. for grades 4-6 on Oct. 14. The game is limited to 12; register online at greenwichlibrary.evanced.info/signup/calendar or by calling 203-622-6883.

Toulouse-Lautrec lecture

Beth S. Gersh, Art historian and director of the N.Y. Arts Exchange, will talk about Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec’s work as part of a burgeoning modernist movement in belle epoque Paris from 2 to 3 p.m. Oct. 14 at Byram Shubert Library, 21 Mead Ave. The event is free and open to the public but an RSVP is required at info@afgreenwich.org.

Trains of the 1930s

Rick Abramson, a 44-year veteran of Connecticut railways, will return to Greenwich Library at 2 p.m. Oct. 14 to discuss the streamlined trains of the 1930s and their designs. Free and open to the public in the Library Meeting Room, 101 W. Putnam Ave. Registration online at greenwichlibrary.evanced.info/signup/calendar or by contacting Carl White at cwhite@greenwichlibrary.org or 203-622-7948.

Black Holes discussed

The Astronomical Society of Greenwich will hold a discussion featuring Andrew MacFayden of New York University’s Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics on “How to See Black Holes” at 3:30 p.m. Oct. 15 at the Cole Auditorium of Greenwich Library, 101 W. Putnam Ave. Event co-sponsored by the library. Free and open to the public.

Abilis fund-raising walk

Abilis is holding its fall fund-raising walk/run on Oct. 15 at Greenwich Point Park. Registration at 7:30 a.m. The 5K run will begin at 9 a.m., as will children’s activities. The one-mile walk will start at 11 a.m. along the waterfront at Tod’s Point. Individuals and teams welcome. A free shuttle will drive To sign up, volunteer or donate, visit www.abilis.us/walk. Free shuttle drive to the clambake area. Enter park and follow Abilis signs to designated parking areas.

Heroes for Hope Award Dinner

The Connecticut chapter of the Israel Cancer Research Fund will host the second annual Heroes for Hope dinner at 6 p.m. Oct. 15 at Temple Sholom, 300 E. Putnam Ave. The keynote speaker will be Tamir Gilat, chairman of ICRF Israel. A businessman, lawyer and former professional goalkeeper for Maccabi Tel Aviv soccer team, Gilat has battled cancer for several years since he was diagnosed at 48 years old. For more information, contact ICRF Connecticut area director David Kweskin at 203-321-1006 or David.Kweskin@icrfonline.org. To register online, visit Connecticut events at icrfonline.org.

Learning to Look

Designed for participants ages 6 and older, Learning to Look is an art history and appreciation program. It is free with admission to the Bruce Museum and will take place from 1 to 2 p.m., with a related activity from 2 to 2:30 p.m., on Oct. 15 at 1 Museum Drive.

Greenwich Academy Open House

Meet faculty, students and administrators and take a tour of campus with student guides Oct. 15 at Greenwich Academy, 200 N. Maple Ave. Tours for lower and middle school students will take place at 1 p.m. and tours for upper school students at 3:30 p.m. At 2:30 p.m., there will be a section on diversity at Greenwich Academy. Register at greenwichacademy.org/openhouse.

Chamber Players Show

The chamber players will perform works by Hungarian, German, Russian, French and Dutch composers at the season opening at 4 p.m. Oct. 15 at Round Hill Community Church, 395 Round Hill Road, and at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 16 at the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive. Single concert tickets are $30 for adults and $5 for students. Season subscriptions are $90 for adults and $15 for students. Future performances include “Russian Idyll” on Nov. 5 and 6, “Blown Away” on March 18 and 19, 2018, and “Transcendent Song” on April 29 and 30, 2018. For more information, call 203-637-4725.

Low-cost microchip event

Greenwich Animal Control will host a low-cost microchip clinic from 10 a.m. to noon Oct. 15 at 393 North St. Dr. Shelley Skopit of Park Animal Hospital in Darien will be at the shelter to microchip pets. For more information, call 203-622-8299.

For love of trees

Artists have until Oct. 16 to participate in the 10th annual Greenwich Tree Conservancy’s Awesome Tree contest dedicated to showing affection for trees through photography, art and writing. Entry forms are available online at www.greenwichtreeconservancy.org and must be emailed by treeconserv@optonline.net by Oct. 16. For those unable to submit an entry electronically, contact Greenwich Tree Conservancy at 203-869-1464 or treeconserv@optonline.net. Finalists will be notified by Oct. 27. The awards reception will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. Nov. 5 at the Bruce Museum. Levels of prizes will be given for each of the five categories and refreshments will be served. Co-sponsored with the Town of Greenwich, the Garden Education Center, the Bruce Museum, Audubon Greenwich, Greenwich Land Trust, Greenwich Green and Clean and Greenwich libraries.

From the Asylum to the Opera

Cora Michael, PhD and independent fine art appraiser, will discuss some of the last paintings created by artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec from 10 to 11 a.m. Oct. 16 at the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive. Reservations are required at brucemuseum.org/site/events. The talk is free for museum members and costs nonmembers $10.

Consulting Business workshop

Bob Hogan, who has more than 30 years of experience in consulting, will review the fundamentals of starting and operating a consulting business from 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 18 in the meeting room at the Greenwich Library, 101 W. Putnam Ave. Registration is encouraged but not required. To register, visit fairfieldcounty.score.org.

Ukrainian artist show

Taras Borovyk will exhibit his oil paintings through Oct. 19 at Les Beaux Arts Gallery inside Round Hill Community Church, 395 Round Hill Road. For more information, call 203-869-1091 or visit roundhillcommunitychurch.org.

Women in leadership

Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham University School of Law, will speak on international terrorism and what it means to the United States from 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 19 at 34 Cathlow Drive.

Bruce Museum’s Icon Awards in the Arts

The Bruce Museum’s Icon Awards in the Arts are presented to distinguished figures in the art world. The evening includes cocktails at 5:30 p.m., award presentations at 6:30 p.m. and dinner at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 19 at the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive. Reservations are required at brucemuseum.org/site/events. For more information, contact Lindsay Saltz at lsaltz@brucemuseum.org.

Fall Playwrights Series

Mark Schenker, senior associate dean and dean of academic affairs at Yale College, heads a three-part lecture series at the Greenwich Library in the Library Meeting Room. The second lecture will be held from 7 to 8 p.m. Oct. 19 and will discuss Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing.” Oscar Wilde’s “The Importance of Being Earnest” is the final lecture, from 7 to 8 p.m. Nov. 16. Attendance is fee. Register online through the library’s calendar at http://bit.ly/2wCaU6E.

Greenwich High School Band Fundraiser

The Greenwich High School Band will travel to Ireland in the spring of 2018 to play at Barretstown, a camp that offers free programs for children and their families living with a serious illness. The band is holding an Irish Country Shindig fundraiser at 7 p.m. Oct. 21 in the barn at Steeple Chase Farm, 429 Taconic Road. Tickets start at $95. To buy tickets, make a donation, or for more information, contact co-chairs Janet Stone McGuigan at JLSMcG@cs.com and Stacy Ochoa at sochoa5@verizon.net.

Greenwich Hospital’s Glow Gala

Greenwich Hospital will hold its annual fundraiser at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 21 at Greenwich Country Club, 19 Doubling Road. The gala will benefit oncology services. To purchase tickets or for more information, contact the special events team by phone at 203-863-3865, by email at events@greenwichhospital.org or online at giving.greenhosp.org/gala2017.

Round Hill Fire Department Open House

Round Hill Fire House, 166 W. Old Mill Road, will hold an open house from noon to 4 p.m. Oct. 22. Free but donations accepted. Attractions include a bouncy castle, food trucks, truck rides and demonstrations from firefighters.

Toulouse-Lautrec Family Day

The Bruce Museum will hold a Toulouse-Lautrec Family Day from 1 to 4 p.m. Oct 22 at the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive. Portraits by caricaturist Dan Springer, see a Toulouse-Lautrec painting come to life with mime and moving statue Linda Peck, French-inspired dance performances by Allegra Dance Greenwich.

Book talk

Greenwich Library will partner with the Yale Alumni Association of Greenwich to bring professor Ruth Bernard Yeazell to Greenwich Library at 4:30 p.m. Oct. 22. A member of Yale’s English department, Yeazell will deliver an audiovisual presentation based on her recent book, “Picture Titles: How and Why Western paintings Acquired Their Names.” Admission is free. Registration is recommended at greenwichlibrary.org.

Harvest supper

Round Hill Community House, 395 Round Hill Road, will hold its traditional Harvest Supper from 5 to 8 p.m. Oct. 22. The dinner is $15 for adults and $5 for children. Reservations are required and can be made at roundhillcommunitychurch.org.

“When the Dead Speak” Lecture

Jennifer Rosati of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, will talk about forensic entomology’s use of insects for homicide investigations. There will be a reception at 6:30 p.m. and the talk will begin at 7 p.m. Oct. 24 at the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive. Registration is required at brucemuseum.org/site/events. Museum members and students with an ID may attend for free; nonmembers must pay $10.

Starting a business

The Women’s Business Development Council will hold a two-hour workshop geared toward taking a business concept to the next level starting at noon on Oct. 24 in the meeting room at Greenwich Library, 101 W. Putnam Ave. Registration is required at greenwichlibrary.evanced.info/signup/Calendar.

Film Series: The Post-Impressionists

The first in a series of films highlighting events, stylistic trademarks and explanations of techniques of four major post-impressionist artists begins with a look at artist Paul Cézanne from 1:30 to 11:30 a.m. Oct. 25 at the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive. The series continues Nov. 1 with a film on Paul Gauguin, then Nov. 8 with a film on Vincent van Gogh, and end Nov. 15 with a film on Henri de Tulouse-Lautrec. Registration is required at brucemuseum.org/site/events. The series is free to members and $10 for nonmembers.

Generation to generation

Round Hill Community Church will host a discussion with Marci Alboher, a vice president at Encore.org, about Encore’s Generation to Generation initiative from 7 to 10 p.m. Oct. 27 at the church, 395 Round Hill Road. For more information, visit roundhillcommunitychurch.org.

Free Family Concert

Curiosity Concerts will present a free family concert featuring pianist Jenny Lin at 3 p.m. Oct. 28 at YWCA Greenwich, 259 E. Putnam Ave. Reservations are required at eventbrite.com/o/curiosity-concerts-4658989221.

Photomicrography

An exhibit of the top 20 award-winning photographs from the 42nd annual Nikon Small World Photomicrography competition will be shown through Oct. 29 at the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive, Greenwich.

Solo exhibit

“Reflection of Nature,” a solo exhibit of paintings by Loft Artist Association member Maria C. Friscia, will be on display through Oct. 29 at the gallery, 575 Pacific St., Stamford. Free and open to the public. Gallery hours 1 to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. For directions and more information, visit loftartists.com or call 203-247-2027.

Zoom in on Nature

Zoomm in on Nature is a drop-in program for children ages 4 and older and their families from 1 to 3 p.m. Oct. 29 at the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive. Program includes simple science concepts and subjects using experiments, projects and crafts. The program is free with admission to the museum.

Women’s Mentoring fundraiser

“Transform Yourself, Transform a Life, Transform a Community” fund-raiser to benefit the Women’s Mentoring Network Inc. is set for 5:30 p.m. Oct. 29 at the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive. Fun, food, drinks, art and optional costumes. Guest speaker is Gloria Bouknight, image and fashion consultant. Tickets $75 at Eventbrite: https//www.eventbrite.com/e/womens-mentoring-network-halloween-fundraiser-tickets-37283403664?aff=es2. For more information, visit www.wmninc.org.

Jazz concerts

St. Catherine of Siena Concerts in the Chapel will present “An Hour of Jazz” at 3 p.m. Oct. 29 at 4 Riverside Ave. Tickets are $20 for adults; children younger than 16 years old enter free. For more information, call 646-338-7664.

Celebrity in Color

Laura Kalba, associate professor at Smith College, will talk about how artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec contributed to and challenged the myth of Paris as a city of beauty, music and sensory delights from 10 to 11 a.m. Oct. 30. Registration is required at brucemuseum.org/site/events. The talk is free to museum members and $10 for nonmembers.

Fall Luncheon

Food Allergy Research and Education will hold the FARE Connecticut Fall Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Nov. 1 at Greenwich Country Club, 19 Doubling Road. The keynote speaker will be James R. Baker Jr., FARE’s CEO and chief medical officer. Tables are available for $10,000, $5,000 and $2,500; individual tickets are available for $1,000, $500 and $250. For more information, visit foodallergy.org.

Author talk

New York Times bestselling author Adam Alter will speak at the Greenwich Library’s Worth Noting event Nov. 2, which begins with a reception at 6 p.m. at the Field Club, 276 Lake Ave. For additional information or tickets, visit greenwichlibrary.org/support/worthnoting or contact Greenwich Library Director of Development Nancy Klein at 203-622-7957 or nklein@greenwichlibrary.org.

Gold Coast photography exhibit

Cos Cob Library will host Jay B. Wilson’s photography exhibit, “Gold Coast: Images from the Shores of Greenwich and Beyond,” through Nov. 3 at 5 Sinoway Road.

Wish Night

Make-A-Wish Connecticut has changed its Celebrating Wishes Ball to Wish Night, a black tie evening with a travel theme. David Williams, CEO and president of Make-A-Wish America, will make a guest appearance. Chance to win 250,000 TrueBlue rewards points from JetBlue. The event will take place at 6 p.m. Nov. 4 at Greenwich Country Club, 19 Doubling Road. Tickets are available at ct.wish/org/wishnight.

Decorative Arts Lecture

The Greenwich Decorative Arts Society will present a lecture by William R. Sargent, an independent curator, on Chinese influence on Western interiors and architecture at 1:15 p.m. Nov. 6 at the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Dr. Admission for non-members of the Greenwich Decorative Arts Society is $25. Reservations can be made at greenwichdecorativearts@gmail.com or 203-322-2967.

Davidoff Cigar Dinner

The Davidoff Cigar Dinner will be held from 7 to 10 p.m. Nov. 8 at Gabriele’s Italian Steakhouse, 35 Church St. Tickets are $280 per person and include three Davidoff cigars, an open bar, a five-course dinner and specials and raffles. Buy tickets online through Oct. 14 at http://bit.ly/2xKSUs6.

Gretchen Carlson

Greenwich Chamber of Commerce will present Gretchen Carlson, former FOX TV news correspondent, as a guest speaker from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 16 at Greenwich Country Club, 19 Doubling Road. All attendees will be provided with a copy of Carlson’s book, “Be Fierce: Stop Harassment and Take Your Power Back.” Attendance is $100 per person, or $950 for a table of 10. Register online at Greenwichchamber.com, write greenwichchamber@greenwichchamber.com or call 203-869-3500.

Enchanted Forest

The Junior League of Greenwich will host its annual holiday fundraiser, The Enchanted Forest, from Nov. 16 through Nov. 18 at Christ Church Greenwich, 254 East Putnam Ave. The official opening of the Enchanted Forest will take place on at 9 a.m. Nov. 17 for Santa’s Breakfast attendees. General admission hours are 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nov. 17 and 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Nov. 18. Activities will include gingerbread workshops, photos with Santa Claus, Santa’s breakfast and children’s entertainment. Funds raised from The Enchanted Forest support community projects implemented by the Junior League of Greenwich. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.501auctions.com/jlg.

Wharton-Edwards exhibit

A new exhibit, ‘George Wharton Edwards (1859-1950): Illustrator, Painter, Writer, will run through Nov. 25 at the Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive, Greenwich. Edwards was a turn-of-the-century painter who lived in Greenwich. The Bruce Museum is open Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., at One Museum Drive, Greenwich. For more information, visit brucemuseum.org or call 203-869-0376.

Toulouse-Lautrec exhibit

The Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive, will show its exhibit, “In the Limelight: Toulouse-Lautrec,” through Jan. 7. Show will feature 100 drawings, prints and posters from the Herakleidon Museum. The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call the Bruce Museum at 203-869-0376 or visit brucemuseum.org.

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Una fiesta al estilo Tiffany Co. nunca pasa de moda. Los colores se ven siempre tan elegantes que sirven para cualquier tipo de celebración. Las cajas azules y el listón blanco son conocidos en todo el mundo como signos de joyería de la marca Tiffany. Una fiesta Tiffany and Co. se centra en los colores azul y blanco, en el cual el tono azul Tiffany es claro, pero no es un tono pastel. Aquí les mostramos algunas fabulosas ideas. tif8tif1 tif2 tif3 tif6 vestido tiffanyvestido tiffany1vestido tiffany2 vestido tiffany3vestido tiffany4tif7 Cubre las sillas con fundas en color blanco que combine con el tono azul de Tiffany. Agrega bandas azules a cada silla. Cubre las mesas con manteles azules.tif9 tif10 tif11 tif12 tif13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Haz una mesa de regalo que se asemeje a las cajas de Tiffany and Co. Agrega bolsas azules y blancas de Tiffany and Co. a la mesa y rellénalas con papel tisú blanco. Puedes agregar premios de fiesta a estas bolsas. Si no cuentas con bolsas oficiales de Tiffany and Co. utiliza bolsas azules y ponles un sello de estilo Tiffany and Co. en un lado. Añade cajas de regalo en tonos azul y blanco a la mesa de regalos.14 15 16 17 18 19 2022 23





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linois. as was demonstrated when he was appointed commissioner for Illinois at the World‘s Exposition, at Paris, in 1889. His report, when his duties were term