Prices and estimates of works Louis Comfort Tiffany

Louis Comfort Tiffany

TweetUnited States (1848 -  1933 ) Wikipedia® : Louis Comfort Tiffany
TIFFANY Louis Comfort Sarah At The Florida Shore

William Doyle /Nov 4, 2015
11,126.77 - 18,544.62
51,926.00

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Artworks in Arcadja
87

Some works of Louis Comfort Tiffany

Extracted between 87 works in the catalog of Arcadja
Louis Comfort Tiffany - On The Corniche

Louis Comfort Tiffany - On The Corniche

Original 1890
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Auction: Brunk Auctions -Nov 18, 2016 - Asheville
Lot number: 458
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Description:
Louis Comfort Tiffany (New York, 1848-1933) On the Corniche, circa 1890, signed lower right "Louis C. Tiffany", watercolor and gouache over pencil on green/gray paper, 10 x 16-3/8 in.; original gilt wood frame with early card label with title, date and "No. 24" in pencil verso, toning from light, laid down on card, slight insect speck; frame with abrasions Lot Notes: Gary A. Reynolds, Curator and author of Louis Comfort Tiffany: The Paintings, referencing On the Corniche, states that the " ‘luminous qualities� of watercolor were well-suited to Tiffany‘s love of color and its portability made it ideal for traveling and painting outdoors. Many of Tiffany‘s most satisfying works are watercolors that capture the color and spontaneity of freshly observed and rendered views. He was especially attracted by subjects such as the dramatic rock formations and stucco buildings of Roque Brune-that featured dramatic variations of color and texture. To achieve these effects, Tiffany combined both opaque and transparent pigments with a minimum of under drawing. In an interview of 1922, Tiffany recalled his enjoyment and using various colors and textures of paper: �Do you know, we Tiffany and Colman in 1878 used to go rummaging about everywhere buying all kinds of old wrapping paper to experiment with.�" Lot accompanied by original exhibition catalog, an early Art Nouveau era card label with title and inscribed verso "No. 24", facsimile letter of appreciation from New York University, Grey Art Gallery, signed by Robert R. Littman, Director and Gary A. Reynolds, Curator., dated June 25, 1979, from Grey Art Gallery Exhibited: Grey Art Gallery, New York University, Louis Comfort Tiffany: The Paintings, March 20-May 12, 1979. Literature: Reynolds, Gary A., Louis Comfort Tiffany: The Paintings, Grey Art Gallery, New York University, March 20-May 12, 1979; New York, 1979, fig.13, p.21-22.
Louis Comfort Tiffany - Chinatown, San Francisco

Louis Comfort Tiffany - Chinatown, San Francisco

Original 1908
Estimate:

Price:

Gross Price
Auction: Bonhams -Apr 12, 2016 - Los-angeles
Lot number: 14
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 1848-1933) Chinatown, San Francisco signed and dated 'Louis C. Tiffany '08' (lower left) watercolor on paper 20 1/2 x 28 1/2in overall: 32 x 40in Painted in 1908 Footnotes Provenance With SKT Galleries, New York, New York, by 1979. Private collection, New York, New York. Private collection, West Palm Beach, Florida. Exhibited New York, American Watercolor Society, Forty-Second Annual Exhibition , 1909 (as Old Chinatown in San Francisco ). Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York, Tiffany Foundation New York and Louis C. Tiffany Foundation Gallery Art Center, Exhibition of Watercolors by Louis C. Tiffany , February 4-15, 1922. New York, New York University, Grey Art Gallery and Study Center, Louis Comfort Tiffany: The Paintings , March 20 - May 12, 1979, no. 71. Literature San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco Chinatown in New Picture , February 26, 1922, D6, illustrated. American Magazine of Art, Watercolors by Louis C. Tiffany , August 13, 1922, p. 258, illustrated (as Street Scene in Chinatown, San Francisco ).
Louis Comfort Tiffany - Arabian Subject

Louis Comfort Tiffany - Arabian Subject

Original 1880
Estimate:

Price:

Auction: Sotheby's -Nov 18, 2015 - New-york
Lot number: 34
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Louis Comfort Tiffany 1848 - 1933 ARABIAN SUBJECT signed Louis C. Tiffany (lower left) watercolor and gouache on paper 15 1/4 by 10 1/8 inches (38.7 by 25.7 cm) Executed circa 1880. Read Condition Report Read Condition Report Register or Log-in to view condition report Saleroom Notice Provenance Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Denora, New York Bellas Artes, Santa Fe, New Mexico Transco Energy Company, Houston, Texas (sold: Sotheby's, New York, December 3, 1992, lot 31, illustrated) Acquired by the present owner at the above sale Exhibited Birmingham, Alabama, Birmingham Museum of Art, American Selections, 1983 Denver, Colorado, Denver Art Museum; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; Brooklyn, New York, The Brooklyn Museum; Fort Worth, Texas, Amon Carter Museum of American Art; Richmond, Virginia, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; Washington, D.C., Corcoran Gallery of Art; Birmingham, Alabama, Birmingham Museum of Art; Indianapolis, Indiana. Indianapolis Museum of Art; Baltimore, Maryland, Walters Art Gallery; Tokyo, Japan, The Shoto Museum of Art (and traveling), Contemplating the American Watercolor: Selections from the Transco Energy Company Collection, Houston, Texas, May 1985-April 1992, illustrated pl. 25
Louis Comfort Tiffany - Sarah At The Florida Shore

Louis Comfort Tiffany - Sarah At The Florida Shore

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Auction: William Doyle -Nov 4, 2015 - New-york
Lot number: 72
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Louis Comfort Tiffany American, 1848-1933 Sarah at the Florida Shore Signed with initials LCT (lr); inscribed as titled and numbered EL.91.2.5 on an old tag Oil on canvas 15 x 23 1/4 inches Provenance: Sarah Eileen Hanley, Oyster Bay, NY Phillips, New York, The Sarah Hanley Collection of Tiffany and Related Items , Feb. 1, 1985, lot 789, cover illus. Elizabeth Ives Bartholet, New York Ms. Carole Soling, Naples, FL Paul E. Doros believes that the present work, which depicts Tiffany's friend and companion, Sarah Hanley, was likely painted around 1928 in Miami, where Tiffany maintained an estate, Comfort Lodge. He has based the date upon Hanley's appearance as well as the looser, more painterly technique, which is consistent with Tiffany's later work. Born in County Sligo, Ireland, Sarah Eileen Hanley (1883-1959) trained as a nurse, immigrating with her siblings to New York City around 1900. Around 1910 she was assigned to care for Louis Comfort Tiffany, who was recuperating from a kidney infection at his home in Oyster Bay, Laurelton Hall. Her patient took an immediate liking to her, and she continued as his companion, caregiver, and friend for the rest of his life. Tiffany, who painted a series of portraits of Hanley, built a home for her across from Laurelton Hall, and named her the first director of the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, established in 1918 as a fellowship program at Laurelton Hall for aspiring artists and craftsmen. Sarah Hanley began exhibiting her own work, largely flower studies and landscapes, in the late 1920s; initially derivative, her paintings grew bolder and increasingly geometric in the ensuing years. She bequeathed her estate to the Dominican Sisters of St. Mary's of the Springs, which in 1985 sold her extensive collection of paintings, vases and objets d'art at auction; Sarah at the Florida Shore was reproduced on the cover of the sale catalogue. We are grateful to Paul E. Doros for his kind assistance in documenting the present work.
Louis Comfort Tiffany - Architectural Study: House Behind A Stone Wall

Louis Comfort Tiffany - Architectural Study: House Behind A Stone Wall

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Auction: William Doyle -Sep 30, 2015 - New-york
Lot number: 69
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Louis Comfort Tiffany American, 1848-1933 (i) Architectural Stu isgzdsax. tiffany schmuckdy: House Behind a Stone Wall Dated indistinctly August 31 18... (lr) Graphite on paper Sight 7 x 9 9/16 inches (ii) Architectural Study: House with Stone Buttresses Dated indistinctly Sept 21st 18... (?) and signed with the artist's initials L.C.T. (cr) Graphite on paper Sight 7 3/8 x 9 9/16 inches (iii) Architectural Study: House with a Cart Beneath a Bridge Signed with the artist's initials L.C.T. and dated indistinctly Oct. 1st 18... (lr) Graphite on paper Sight 7 x 9 5/8 inches (iv) Architectural Study: House Behind a Foot Bridge Signed with the artist's initials L.C.T. and dated indistinctly Sept. 6th 18... (lr) Graphite on paper Sight 7 1/2 x 9 9/16 inches (v) Architectural Study: House in Winter Signed with the artist's initials L.C.T. and dated indistinctly Jan. 22nd... (lr) Graphite on paper Sight 7 1/8 x 9 5/8 inches (vi) Architectural Study: House with Figures Seated on a Bench Graphite on paper 7 1/4 x 11 inches Unframed

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IN THE NEWS

Louis Comfort Tiffany

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TRAVEL

Chapel Of Light Shines At Museum

By Compiled From Staff Reports, October 22, 2001
A multimillion-dollar Tiffany chapel created more than 100 years ago was almost lost forever before being restored and put on display at the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art in Winter Park. The rich, Byzantine-inspired interior with its huge columns and arches debuted in 1893 at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. It brought designer Louis Comfort Tiffany a level of international acclaim few American artists enjoyed at the time. With his glass mosaic surfaces reflecting light through the intense colors of stained glass, Tiffany hoped to showcase the artistry and craftsmanship of his newly founded firm, Tiffany Glass & Decorating Co. But the work evoked such strong religious feelings among those who viewed it that men doffed their hats in response.
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TRAVEL

Photographs Illustrate Another Chapter Of Tiffany's Creative Life

February 9, 2001
Most people know Louis Comfort Tiffany for his lamps and his revolutionary and internationally heralded stained-glass windows, but few have any idea that he was also a photographer whose interest extended to art photography. This intriguing chapter of Tiffany's creative life is illustrated in more than 30 images that will go on view Tuesday at the Morse Museum of American Art in the first-known exhibition of his photography: "Louis Comfort Tiffany, Photographer." The exhibition will continue through June 10. Tiffany's many photographic subjects included people, boats, landscapes and architecture.
LIFE/FAMILY

Museum Revives Stained-glass Sparkle Of Tiffany Chapel

By Compiled From Staff Reports, October 15, 1999
A multimillion-dollar Tiffany chapel created more than 100 years ago was almost lost forever before being restored and put on display this spring at the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art in Winter Park.The rich, Byzantine-inspired interior with its huge columns and arches debuted in 1893 at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. It brought designer Louis Comfort Tiffany a level of international acclaim few American artists enjoyed at the time.With his glass mosaic surfaces reflecting light through the intense colors of stained glass, Tiffany hoped to showcase the artistry and craftsmanship of his newly founded firm, Tiffany Glass & Decorating Co. But the work evoked such strong religious feelings among those who viewed it that men doffed their hats in response.
LOCAL

Letters enlighten art detectives on woman behind Tiffany works

By Lisa Anderson Chicago Tribune, March 6, 2007
NEW YORK -- Asking who designed Louis Comfort Tiffany's iconic lamps might seem the decorative art world's equivalent to the schoolyard stumper, "Who's buried in Grant's tomb?" While Ulysses S. Grant is indeed buried in Grant's tomb, fresh evidence reveals that Tiffany did not design most of the lavish leaded-glass lamps bearing his name, solving a century-old mystery art historians didn't even know existed. So, whodunit? Clara Pierce Wolcott Driscoll did. And she, and the 35 women who worked under her supervision, did it very well, as a new exhibit at the New-York Historical Society, "A New Light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls," makes clear.
BUSINESS

Tiffany Shines At Smithsonian

By Glen Elsasser, Chicago Tribune, November 25, 1989
The colossus of Tiffany lamps is crowned with a shade of deep red poppies, a lush indoor garden when lighted.Standing more than 6 feet tall, the lamp's shade is 30 inches in diameter, the largest floor model ever made by Tiffany Studios - the atelier of Louis Comfort Tiffany, artist turned artisan. For more than 50 years beginning in the late 1800s, New York-based Tiffany Studios produced tasteful items for American homes.''Until this show, no one had seen a floor lamp of such dimensions,'' said Alastair Duncan, guest consultant for the Masterworks of Louis Comfort Tiffany exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution's Renwick Gallery in Washington.
TRAVEL

Friday Nights Are Free At Home Of Tiffany Glass

November 11, 1999
Visitors have an even better chance to check out the world's largest collection of the stained-glass work of Louis Comfort Tiffany.Not only is the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art offering free admission on Friday evenings through the end of the year, it's staying open later than usual to make it easier for busy art lovers to pay a visit to the impressive collection.From 4 to 8 p.m. every Friday in November and December, you can stroll through the galleries and admire the works of Tiffany, including a multimillion-dollar chapel made for the 1893 World's Fair and painstakingly restored by the museum this year.
ENTERTAINMENT

Free Fridays at the Morse

By Mary Frances Emmons, Sentinel Staff Writer, November 20, 2009
WHAT: If you needed another reason to love this time of year, here are several: the return of free Friday nights at the Morse Museum in Winter Park (which continue well into spring), along with the museum's much loved (and free) Christmas in the Park event, now in its 31st year, and its annual free admission day on Christmas Eve. Although the museum is open free tonight, the Morse's musical program starts next Friday. (Pictured: "Hudson River Landscape near Dobbs Ferry," circa 1870 by Samuel Colman, part of the museum's "Paintings by Louis Comfort Tiffany and his Circle," through Oct. 3, 2010.
LIFESTYLE

Tiffany's Treasure Is In Season

October 9, 2001
Today the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art unveils something not seen in nearly 100 years: the restored and reunited panels of Louis Comfort Tiffany's breathtaking window, "The Four Seasons." The 16-foot installation reunites six border panels with the four primary panels for the first time since Tiffany divided them for installation in his Long Island home, Laurelton Hall, where they were incorporated into the living room and entry hall. Originally presented in Paris in 1892, the window won international praise throughout the 1890s and took a gold medal at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT

Morse Museum offers free guided tour of Tiffany wing

Posted by Matthew J. Palm, Orlando Sentinel Arts Writer, August 1, 2013
WHAT: If you still haven't gotten around to viewing the Morse Museum's newest Tiffany wing galleries, here's a great opportunity: Morse curator Donna Climenhage will give two free tours on Tuesday, Aug. 6. The Morse is the world's foremost museum for the works of American glass artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Its newest galleries, highlighting Tiffany's longtime Long Island estate and its decorative furnishings, opened in February 2011. The galleries display more than 250 treasures from the estate, called Laurelton Hall.


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Glass Master

By Glen Elsasser, Chicago Tribune | November 19, 1989
The colossus of Tiffany lamps is crowned with a shade of deep red poppies, a lush indoor garden when lighted. Standing more than 6 feet tall, the lamp boasts a shade 30 inches in diameter, the largest floor model ever made by Tiffany Studios-the atelier of Louis Comfort Tiffany, artist turned artisan. For more than 50 years beginning in the late 1800s, New York-based Tiffany Studios produced tasteful items for American homes. "Until this show, no one had seen a floor lamp of such dimensions," said...
NEWS

Ex-Gov. Thompson to auction off office art

By Joseph Ruzich and Stacy St. Clair, Chicago Tribune | December 5, 2013
Former Illinois Gov. James Thompson is parting with 19 pieces of art he owns to make way for a different collection in his Loop law office. The artwork, which includes paintings, prints and sculptures that are Chicago-themed or by Chicago artists, will be up for auction Saturday at the John Toomey Gallery in Oak Park. Thompson, a partner at Winston & Strawn on Wacker Drive and longtime art collector, said the pieces to be auctioned off have made way in his office for artwork and...
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NEWS

The photograph of the stained-glass window by Louis...

April 9, 1996
The photograph of the stained-glass window by Louis Comfort Tiffany on the cover of the April 7 Magazine was incorrectly identified. The window is in the First Presbyterian Church of Lake Forest. The Tribune regrets the error.
ENTERTAINMENT

Driehaus exhibit shows off the glory of Tiffany pieces

By Kerry Reid, Special to the Tribune | October 30, 2013
The Gilded Age Gold Coast mansion of Samuel Mayo Nickerson, one of the founders of the First National Bank of Chicago, once served as a live-in art gallery for Nickerson and his wife, Mathilda, who donated their extensive collection of Asian art to the Art Institute in 1900. Now the home, designed and built between 1879 and 1883 by Edward J. Burling of Chicago's Burling and Whitehouse firm, serves as the lush backdrop for the decorative arts collection of Richard H....
FEATURES

Tiffany Treasures

By M.W. Newman, a veteran Chicago journalist, specializes in urban and architectural affairs | April 7, 1996
Louis Comfort Tiffany was a moneyed swell, and his middle name truly as well as figuratively was Comfort. Breakfast at Tiffany's was steamer clams, strawberries in heavy cream or both. Ever the connoisseur, he presided over a 580-acre estate on Long Island and traveled in his own railroad car. But this privileged heir to the Tiffany jewelry fortune was no dilettante. He was the great American master of art glass and church stained glass, a Renaissance throwback in seashore flannels.
FEATURES

A restoration drama

BY TOM HUNDLEY | June 29, 2008
It took some detective work--and a little urban archaeology--but the results should dispel one of the enduring myths of Chicago architecture. At the same time, they will reveal the bejeweled Tiffany dome of the Chicago Cultural Center not as many Chicagoans remember it, but as Louis Comfort Tiffany imagined it. The Tiffany dome, in the Preston Bradley Hall at the south end of the Cultural Center, has been undergoing a six-month, $2.2 million restoration...
NEWS

Hugh Mckean, Art Collector, Museum Chief

May 9, 1995
Hugh Ferguson McKean, 86, an art collector, artist, museum director and former college president, preserved a major Tiffany art collection that is in a museum in Winter Park, Fla., and which was exhibited in 1984 at the Museum of Science and Industry. A resident of Winter Park, he died Saturday at home. In 1930, his own artwork led to him studying for the summer at Laurelton Hall, the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Tiffany's work in stained glass windows, mosaics, lamps...
NEWS

Letters enlighten art buffs

By Lisa Anderson, Tribune national correspondent | March 5, 2007
Asking who designed Louis Comfort Tiffany's iconic lamps might seem the decorative art world's equivalent to the schoolyard stumper, "Who's buried in Grant's tomb?" While Ulysses S. Grant is indeed buried in Grant's tomb, fresh evidence reveals that Tiffany did not design most of the lavish leaded-glass lamps bearing his name, solving a century-old mystery art historians didn't even know existed. So, whodunit? Clara Pierce Wolcott Driscoll did it. And she, and the 35 women who worked under her...
TRAVEL

Stretch Your Mind At A New Museum

By Michael Kilian, Tribune Staff Writer | April 2, 2000
The nation's newest modern art museum -- the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art in Florida -- has just opened with an electrifying inaugural exhibition of mind-stretching artworks that use not only film and video but an altogether revolutionary medium: time itself. Called "Making Time: Considering Time as a Material in Contemporary Video and Film," the sound and light show features highly unusual pieces by such modern masters as Andy Warhol, Nam June Paik and Bruce Nauman.
NEWS

Funeral to be ecumenical

By Glen Elsasser, Special to the Tribune | September 7, 2005
The funeral of Chief Justice William Rehnquist will be an ecumenical service Wednesday in St. Matthew the Apostle Catholic Cathedral, an architectural gem that reflects the new cosmopolitan taste of the late 19th Century. Semi-precious stones decorate the white marble main altar, which came from the archbishop of Agra, India, the home of the fabled Taj Mahal, a 17th Century mausoleum. An inlaid marble plaque in front of the sanctuary gates commemorates the funeral mass of President John Kennedy in...
NEWS

Navy Pier gets touch of glass

By Stan Donaldson, Tribune staff reporter | June 25, 2003
A new exhibit of 18 Tiffany windows from old churches, cemeteries and private homes opened at Navy Pier Tuesday in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows. The collection features the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the late 19th Century and early 20th Century artist, said Rolf Achilles, curator for the museum. "What we have gathered here is one of the great collections in the United States of landscape, figurative windows and generic windows if you will, the kind that Tiffany made his fame...
TRAVEL

Cheap British bus A new no-frills bus service...

By From Tribune news services | July 25, 2004
Cheap British bus A new no-frills bus service, Megabus.com, has been introduced in Britain with the lowest fare being 1 pound (about $1.85) for a single journey on any route. Reservations must be made online. From London, stops include Oxford, Brighton and Plymouth. Megabus also has services in Scotland from Edinburgh and Glasgow, and in the north of England from Manchester to London. The network uses double-decker buses bought from a previous business in Hong Kong. Toilets...
NEWS

Tiffany windows added to Smith Museum display at Navy Pier

June 25, 2003
A new exhibit of 18 Tiffany windows from old churches, cemeteries and private homes opened at Navy Pier on Tuesday in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows. The collection features the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the late 19th Century and early 20th Century artist, said Rolf Achilles, curator for the museum. "What we have gathered here is one of the great collections in the United States of landscape, figurative windows and generic windows if you will, the...
NEWS

Navy Pier gets touch of glass

By Stan Donaldson, Tribune staff reporter | June 25, 2003
A new exhibit of 18 Tiffany windows from old churches, cemeteries and private homes opened at Navy Pier Tuesday in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows. The collection features the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the late 19th Century and early 20th Century artist, said Rolf Achilles, curator for the museum. "What we have gathered here is one of the great collections in the United States of landscape, figurative windows and generic windows if you will, the kind that Tiffany made his fame...
NEWS

Glass through history

By Elaine Markoutsas, Universal Press Syndicate | September 1, 2002
Glass has captivated man for thousands of years. The Phoenicians became aware of its unique properties about 5000 B.C., when they discovered a vitreous material left from melted blocks of nitrate mixed with sand, a result of fires they lit to cook. Glass beads were known in Egypt around 3500 B.C. The technique of glass blowing is attributed to the Syrians, but the Romans made it an art. Today, collectors of ancient Roman glass vessels marvel at their extraordinary color, mostly iridescent blues...
NEWS

Tiffany windows added to Smith Museum display at Navy Pier

June 25, 2003
A new exhibit of 18 Tiffany windows from old churches, cemeteries and private homes opened at Navy Pier on Tuesday in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows. The collection features the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the late 19th Century and early 20th Century artist, said Rolf Achilles, curator for the museum. "What we have gathered here is one of the great collections in the United States of landscape, figurative windows and generic windows if you will, the...
NEWS

Quezal glass has rich history

By Leslie Hindman | March 10, 2002
Q. Enclosed are photos of two vases given to me by my mother. The bottom of each vase is signed QUEZAL. I was told they're worth over $1,000 each but would like your opinion. One is 11 inches tall and the other is 11 1/4 inches tall. --Anne Pfeifer, Northbrook A. The big names in American art glass are Louis Comfort Tiffany, maker of Tiffany "Favrile" glass, and Frederick Carder, maker of Stueben "Aurene" glass. Tiffany produced glass from 1892 to 1928, while Carder's designs were made from...
NEWS

Glass through history

By Elaine Markoutsas, Universal Press Syndicate | September 1, 2002
Glass has captivated man for thousands of years. The Phoenicians became aware of its unique properties about 5000 B.C., when they discovered a vitreous material left from melted blocks of nitrate mixed with sand, a result of fires they lit to cook. Glass beads were known in Egypt around 3500 B.C. The technique of glass blowing is attributed to the Syrians, but the Romans made it an art. Today, collectors of ancient Roman glass vessels marvel at their extraordinary color, mostly iridescent blues...
FEATURES

5,500 People Search For Best Of The Old

By Michele Weber Hurwitz | February 24, 1991
For discerning antique collectors or families out for fun and a break from the weather, last weekend's fourth annual Northwest Suburban Antique Show was the place to be. Where else could you find items like an original Tiffany glass bowl, signed by Louis Comfort Tiffany himself, or a lace christening dress dating from 1870? Sixty dealers from five states showcased the best of the old at the three-day antique show at Harper College in Palatine. Show organizers Carol Gianopoulos...
NEWS

Glass use has a long history

By Elaine Markoutsas, Universal Press Syndicate | August 11, 2002
Glass has captivated man for thousands of years. The Phoenicians became aware of its unique properties about 5000 B.C., when they discovered a vitreous material left from melted blocks of nitrate mixed with sand, a result of fires they lit to cook. Glass beads were known in Egypt around 3500 B.C. The technique of glass blowing is attributed to the Syrians, but the Romans made it an art. Today, collectors of ancient Roman glass vessels marvel at their extraordinary color, mostly iridescent...
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are grateful to Paul E. Doros for his kind assistance in documenting the present work.
Louis Comfort Tiffany - Architectural Study: House Behind A Stone Wall

Louis Comfort Tiffany - Architectural Study: House Behind A Stone Wall

Original
Estimate:

Price:

Net Price
Auction: William Doyle -Sep 30, 2015 - New-york
Lot number: 69
Other WORKS AT AUCTION
Description:
Louis Comfort Tiffany American, 1848-1933 (i) Architectural Stu isgzdsax.