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Glass Master

By Glen Elsasser, Chicago Tribune | November 19, 1989
The colossus of Tiffany lamps is crowned with a shade of deep red poppies, a lush indoor garden when lighted. Standing more than 6 feet tall, the lamp boasts a shade 30 inches in diameter, the largest floor model ever made by Tiffany Studios-the atelier of Louis Comfort Tiffany, artist turned artisan. For more than 50 years beginning in the late 1800s, New York-based Tiffany Studios produced tasteful items for American homes. "Until this show, no one had seen a floor lamp of such dimensions," said...
NEWS

Ex-Gov. Thompson to auction off office art

By Joseph Ruzich and Stacy St. Clair, Chicago Tribune | December 5, 2013
Former Illinois Gov. James Thompson is parting with 19 pieces of art he owns to make way for a different collection in his Loop law office. The artwork, which includes paintings, prints and sculptures that are Chicago-themed or by Chicago artists, will be up for auction Saturday at the John Toomey Gallery in Oak Park. Thompson, a partner at Winston & Strawn on Wacker Drive and longtime art collector, said the pieces to be auctioned off have made way in his office for artwork and...
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NEWS

The photograph of the stained-glass window by Louis...

April 9, 1996
The photograph of the stained-glass window by Louis Comfort Tiffany on the cover of the April 7 Magazine was incorrectly identified. The window is in the First Presbyterian Church of Lake Forest. The Tribune regrets the error.
ENTERTAINMENT

Driehaus exhibit shows off the glory of Tiffany pieces

By Kerry Reid, Special to the Tribune | October 30, 2013
The Gilded Age Gold Coast mansion of Samuel Mayo Nickerson, one of the founders of the First National Bank of Chicago, once served as a live-in art gallery for Nickerson and his wife, Mathilda, who donated their extensive collection of Asian art to the Art Institute in 1900. Now the home, designed and built between 1879 and 1883 by Edward J. Burling of Chicago's Burling and Whitehouse firm, serves as the lush backdrop for the decorative arts collection of Richard H....
FEATURES

Tiffany Treasures

By M.W. Newman, a veteran Chicago journalist, specializes in urban and architectural affairs | April 7, 1996
Louis Comfort Tiffany was a moneyed swell, and his middle name truly as well as figuratively was Comfort. Breakfast at Tiffany's was steamer clams, strawberries in heavy cream or both. Ever the connoisseur, he presided over a 580-acre estate on Long Island and traveled in his own railroad car. But this privileged heir to the Tiffany jewelry fortune was no dilettante. He was the great American master of art glass and church stained glass, a Renaissance throwback in seashore flannels.
FEATURES

A restoration drama

BY TOM HUNDLEY | June 29, 2008
It took some detective work--and a little urban archaeology--but the results should dispel one of the enduring myths of Chicago architecture. At the same time, they will reveal the bejeweled Tiffany dome of the Chicago Cultural Center not as many Chicagoans remember it, but as Louis Comfort Tiffany imagined it. The Tiffany dome, in the Preston Bradley Hall at the south end of the Cultural Center, has been undergoing a six-month, $2.2 million restoration...
NEWS

Hugh Mckean, Art Collector, Museum Chief

May 9, 1995
Hugh Ferguson McKean, 86, an art collector, artist, museum director and former college president, preserved a major Tiffany art collection that is in a museum in Winter Park, Fla., and which was exhibited in 1984 at the Museum of Science and Industry. A resident of Winter Park, he died Saturday at home. In 1930, his own artwork led to him studying for the summer at Laurelton Hall, the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Tiffany's work in stained glass windows, mosaics, lamps...
NEWS

Letters enlighten art buffs

By Lisa Anderson, Tribune national correspondent | March 5, 2007
Asking who designed Louis Comfort Tiffany's iconic lamps might seem the decorative art world's equivalent to the schoolyard stumper, "Who's buried in Grant's tomb?" While Ulysses S. Grant is indeed buried in Grant's tomb, fresh evidence reveals that Tiffany did not design most of the lavish leaded-glass lamps bearing his name, solving a century-old mystery art historians didn't even know existed. So, whodunit? Clara Pierce Wolcott Driscoll did it. And she, and the 35 women who worked under her...
TRAVEL

Stretch Your Mind At A New Museum

By Michael Kilian, Tribune Staff Writer | April 2, 2000
The nation's newest modern art museum -- the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art in Florida -- has just opened with an electrifying inaugural exhibition of mind-stretching artworks that use not only film and video but an altogether revolutionary medium: time itself. Called "Making Time: Considering Time as a Material in Contemporary Video and Film," the sound and light show features highly unusual pieces by such modern masters as Andy Warhol, Nam June Paik and Bruce Nauman.
NEWS

Funeral to be ecumenical

By Glen Elsasser, Special to the Tribune | September 7, 2005
The funeral of Chief Justice William Rehnquist will be an ecumenical service Wednesday in St. Matthew the Apostle Catholic Cathedral, an architectural gem that reflects the new cosmopolitan taste of the late 19th Century. Semi-precious stones decorate the white marble main altar, which came from the archbishop of Agra, India, the home of the fabled Taj Mahal, a 17th Century mausoleum. An inlaid marble plaque in front of the sanctuary gates commemorates the funeral mass of President John Kennedy in...
NEWS

Navy Pier gets touch of glass

By Stan Donaldson, Tribune staff reporter | June 25, 2003
A new exhibit of 18 Tiffany windows from old churches, cemeteries and private homes opened at Navy Pier Tuesday in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows. The collection features the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the late 19th Century and early 20th Century artist, said Rolf Achilles, curator for the museum. "What we have gathered here is one of the great collections in the United States of landscape, figurative windows and generic windows if you will, the kind that Tiffany made his fame...
TRAVEL

Cheap British bus A new no-frills bus service...

By From Tribune news services | July 25, 2004
Cheap British bus A new no-frills bus service, Megabus.com, has been introduced in Britain with the lowest fare being 1 pound (about $1.85) for a single journey on any route. Reservations must be made online. From London, stops include Oxford, Brighton and Plymouth. Megabus also has services in Scotland from Edinburgh and Glasgow, and in the north of England from Manchester to London. The network uses double-decker buses bought from a previous business in Hong Kong. Toilets...
NEWS

Tiffany windows added to Smith Museum display at Navy Pier

June 25, 2003
A new exhibit of 18 Tiffany windows from old churches, cemeteries and private homes opened at Navy Pier on Tuesday in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows. The collection features the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the late 19th Century and early 20th Century artist, said Rolf Achilles, curator for the museum. "What we have gathered here is one of the great collections in the United States of landscape, figurative windows and generic windows if you will, the...
NEWS

Navy Pier gets touch of glass

By Stan Donaldson, Tribune staff reporter | June 25, 2003
A new exhibit of 18 Tiffany windows from old churches, cemeteries and private homes opened at Navy Pier Tuesday in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows. The collection features the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the late 19th Century and early 20th Century artist, said Rolf Achilles, curator for the museum. "What we have gathered here is one of the great collections in the United States of landscape, figurative windows and generic windows if you will, the kind that Tiffany made his fame...
NEWS

Glass through history

By Elaine Markoutsas, Universal Press Syndicate | September 1, 2002
Glass has captivated man for thousands of years. The Phoenicians became aware of its unique properties about 5000 B.C., when they discovered a vitreous material left from melted blocks of nitrate mixed with sand, a result of fires they lit to cook. Glass beads were known in Egypt around 3500 B.C. The technique of glass blowing is attributed to the Syrians, but the Romans made it an art. Today, collectors of ancient Roman glass vessels marvel at their extraordinary color, mostly iridescent blues...
NEWS

Tiffany windows added to Smith Museum display at Navy Pier

June 25, 2003
A new exhibit of 18 Tiffany windows from old churches, cemeteries and private homes opened at Navy Pier on Tuesday in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows. The collection features the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the late 19th Century and early 20th Century artist, said Rolf Achilles, curator for the museum. "What we have gathered here is one of the great collections in the United States of landscape, figurative windows and generic windows if you will, the...
NEWS

Quezal glass has rich history

By Leslie Hindman | March 10, 2002
Q. Enclosed are photos of two vases given to me by my mother. The bottom of each vase is signed QUEZAL. I was told they're worth over $1,000 each but would like your opinion. One is 11 inches tall and the other is 11 1/4 inches tall. --Anne Pfeifer, Northbrook A. The big names in American art glass are Louis Comfort Tiffany, maker of Tiffany "Favrile" glass, and Frederick Carder, maker of Stueben "Aurene" glass. Tiffany produced glass from 1892 to 1928, while Carder's designs were made from...
NEWS

Glass through history

By Elaine Markoutsas, Universal Press Syndicate | September 1, 2002
Glass has captivated man for thousands of years. The Phoenicians became aware of its unique properties about 5000 B.C., when they discovered a vitreous material left from melted blocks of nitrate mixed with sand, a result of fires they lit to cook. Glass beads were known in Egypt around 3500 B.C. The technique of glass blowing is attributed to the Syrians, but the Romans made it an art. Today, collectors of ancient Roman glass vessels marvel at their extraordinary color, mostly iridescent blues...
FEATURES

5,500 People Search For Best Of The Old

By Michele Weber Hurwitz | February 24, 1991
For discerning antique collectors or families out for fun and a break from the weather, last weekend's fourth annual Northwest Suburban Antique Show was the place to be. Where else could you find items like an original Tiffany glass bowl, signed by Louis Comfort Tiffany himself, or a lace christening dress dating from 1870? Sixty dealers from five states showcased the best of the old at the three-day antique show at Harper College in Palatine. Show organizers Carol Gianopoulos...
NEWS

Glass use has a long history

By Elaine Markoutsas, Universal Press Syndicate | August 11, 2002
Glass has captivated man for thousands of years. The Phoenicians became aware of its unique properties about 5000 B.C., when they discovered a vitreous material left from melted blocks of nitrate mixed with sand, a result of fires they lit to cook. Glass beads were known in Egypt around 3500 B.C. The technique of glass blowing is attributed to the Syrians, but the Romans made it an art. Today, collectors of ancient Roman glass vessels marvel at their extraordinary color, mostly iridescent...
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Louis Comfort Tiffany

1837 - 1933

Louis Comfort Tiffany was a Renaissance man during a period of history known as the Gilded Age. As an artist of many media and decorative arts, his lengthy career, from the 1870's to the mid-1920's, spanned and shaped several design periods during a time of "experimentation, intense scrutiny of aesthetic ideals, and proliferation of new styles in the world of art." Throughout his career, he forged a unique style that combined superb craftsmanship with a love of natural forms and brilliant color. His luminous glass designs combined technical innovations with the highest artistry infusing everyday objects with beauty inspired by nature.

Born in New York City, Louis Comfort Tiffany was the eldest son of Charles Lewis Tiffany, who had founded Tiffany & Co in 1837. Raised in an atmosphere of tremendous wealth and expensive taste, Tiffany was a natural aesthete, and opted against joining his father's company in favor of studying the fine arts.

Tiffany continued to paint, but he made his mark in the decorative arena. There was hardly a medium to which he did not turn, including furniture, metalwork, textiles, pottery, enamels, jewelry, and book design. He became interested in the decorative possibilities of glass in the late 1870s and employed it throughout his career.

Tiffany participated in the Aesthetic Movement, which conferred a new, higher status to the decorative arts. Like other members of the movement, he drew upon historical sources and was attracted to the arts of such exotic places as China, Japan, ancient Greece, Egypt, Venice, India, and the Islamic world. Tiffany likewise responded to the tenets of contemporary British reform movements, emulating the practices of British designer William Morris, and appreciated the fine craftsmanship championed by the Arts and Crafts Movement.

Tiffany's many travels to Europe and the Near East were influential in his choices as a glassmaker. He was especially inspired by Gothic stained glass windows, Persian glass, English cameo, the idea of imitating in glass natural stones such as agate, and the iridescence found in excavated ancient Syrian and Roman glass. Tiffany was critical of the contemporary practice of painting on glass, which he felt obscured the innate qualities of glass. He sought to maximize the potential of the medium itself, developing new methods resulting in iridescent finishes, lava glass, and his most important innovation, Favrile glass.

Favrile glass — a term Tiffany invented from the Latin fabrilis, meaning handmade — is produced by exposing molten glass to a series of vapors and metallic oxides that infuse it with radiant colors and iridescence. The name, as it applied to his own product, was trademarked in 1894. By this point, Tiffany had opened a new glass factory in Corona, Queens, and had begun marketing his Favrile windows, lamps, vases and mosaics in America and in Europe.

In 1878, Tiffany designed his first interior —for his own home in the Bella Apartments at 48 East Twenty-sixth Street, where he lived with his wife and three children. Hardly a surface was left plain: Oriental rugs were scattered across floors; Japanese patterned papers were affixed to walls and ceilings; carved and painted woodwork from India served as architectural embellishment for windows; colored and leaded glass filled window openings; and pictures and objects of various styles and media, including pottery, porcelain, and metalwork from China and Japan, were arranged throughout. Much of the furniture was remarkably simple, a foil for the proliferation of ornament.

Louis C. Tiffany and Associated Artists was founded in 1879, the first of several decorating partnerships. Tiffany joined forces with the American painter Samuel Colman, who suggested colors and patterns for walls and ceilings. Lockwood de Forest, an artist and collector of Indian artifacts, provided carved woodwork and furniture. Candace Wheeler created textiles and embroidery to Tiffany's designs. Tiffany, who specialized in glass, remained in charge of the overall design process. The firm enjoyed great success, counting among its clients such prominent figures as President Chester Arthur, pharmaceuticals millionaire George Kemp, elder statesman Hamilton Fish, president of the Metropolitan Museum John Taylor Johnston, author Mark Twain, and the Veterans of New York's Seventh Regiment Armory.

After 1883 Tiffany worked primarily on his own. In 1885 he completed work on his second home, in a massive McKim, Mead, and White-designed Romanesque revival building at Seventy-Second Street and Madison Avenue commissioned by his father. Tiffany's top floor studio was perhaps the most startling room. With its theatrical and cave-like appearance, unique four-sided central fireplace, and forest of glass lanterns of various shapes and colors suspended from the ceiling, it was described as "a dream: Arabian Nights in New York."

Tiffany continued to work on residential, public, and ecclesiastical interiors to a far greater extent than many have assumed. One of the most remarkable commissions was for the home of two of his most important patrons, Louisine and Henry Osborne Havemeyer. Their house at 1 East Sixty-Sixth Street, completed in 1892, was replete with glowing iridescent glass-mosaic walls, lighting fixtures of Near Eastern derivation, elaborate filigreed balustrades and fireplace screens, and a dramatic suspended staircase. Tiffany was responsible for every decorative element, enhancing the unified effect. His artisans and designers mastered the techniques needed to produce and decorate objects in metal, wood, glass, fabric, and wallpaper and became manufacturers of rugs, glass mosaics, lighting fixtures, and ornamental cast bronzes.

Tiffany's creativity peaked as Art Nouveau burst on the scene in Europe in the mid-1890s. The primary proponent of Art Nouveau in America, Tiffany's work exemplified the movement's aims to develop a new aesthetic based in nature. While the French and Belgian Art Nouveau artists abstracted nature into sinuous curves, and the Viennese and Scottish experimented with geometric abstraction, Tiffany sought to depict the colors and forms of nature in a more straightforward, impressionistic manner. His lily lamps follow nature's logic, with petals and leaves on the shade and stems, and stalks on the base, while his "Agate" and "Lava" glass vases closely approximate the appearance of other natural materials. Far from resulting in a simplified version of Art Nouveau themes, however, Tiffany's glass is invariably complex in composition and appearance. What began as formal interpretations of nature grew into a love of lush naturalism, and as his artistic career progressed, he became increasingly preoccupied by illusionistic depictions of landscapes and flowers. His was not an intellectual approach to art; rather it was a sensory one, providing feasts of color, light, and texture.

Post-Civil War prosperity produced patrons who were not merely rich but also cultured and who shared an aptitude for experimentation. They were poised for Tiffany, who coupled his artistic ambitions with a unique marketing ability that enabled him to publicize his wares to an extent formerly unknown in America. Tiffany utilized the great international fairs of the late nineteenth century as promotional vehicles for his artistic work. He first exhibited his oil paintings at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia and later at the 1889 Exposition Universelle in Paris. It was the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893 in Chicago, however, that was a watershed event in Tiffany's career. Over a million people visited his exhibit, which was the subject of numerous accounts in the press and the catalyst for many new commissions. During that period the Parisian dealer Siegfried Bing saw Tiffany's work, and his assessment of it led to his sponsorship of Tiffany in Paris and throughout Europe. Tiffany continued to make strong showings and receive awards at international fairs, notably Paris in 1900, Buffalo in 1901, Turin in 1902, and St. Louis in 1904. As a result, his work was widely known and acclaimed throughout America and around the world.

Early institutional collectors of Tiffany glass included the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, Tokyo's Imperial Museum, and many other museums around the world. His stained glass windows can still be found in many of America's oldest colleges and universities, among them Yale, Harvard, Princeton, Columbia, Brown, Vassar and Wellesley, as well as the Smithsonian and the Chicago Art Institute.

While Tiffany Studios primarily manufactured glass for lamps, vases and windows, it also produced objects in copper and bronze collectively called "Fancy Goods" in his catalogues. Also inspired by nature, his metalwork designs were used for candelabras, desk sets, picture frames, and other objects, and often incorporated glass elements. When Tiffany took over as vice president and artistic director of Tiffany & Co. after his father's death in 1902, Tiffany Studios also began producing jewelry, primarily using semiprecious stones and enamels, and retaining the Studios' primary motifs of plants and insects.

An autocratic perfectionist, Tiffany was known to walk down the production lines with his cane and strike any piece that he found unacceptable. And yet, he always had an eye on the bottom line and would cease production of any item that went unsold for one year.

Shortly after the First World War, tastes shifted dramatically away from Art Nouveau and toward the sparer Bauhaus aesthetic. With the concomitant loss of revenue, as well as the decline in fortune due to Tiffany's lifestyle and his Foundation, Tiffany Studios declared bankruptcy in 1932. Louis Comfort Tiffany died on January 17, 1933 in New York, in relative obscurity. It was not until the late 1950's that scholars and collectors began rediscovering Tiffany's work, and jumpstarted the process of resurrecting his reputation as an artist, innovator, and pioneer of modernism as he is now known today.


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The Jewelry of Louis Comfort Tiffany

  • 01 of 03

    Louis Comfort Tiffany's Art Jewelry

    Tiffany Peacock Necklace, ca. 1903-06, on Display at the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of Art in Winter Park, Florida.
    Tiffany Peacock Necklace, ca. 1903-06, on Display at the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of Art in Winter Park, Florida. Jay B. Siegel

    Louis Comfort Tiffany continued the tradition of offering unique jewelry the patrons of Tiffany & Co. had come to expect when he took over the company in 1902 after his father, Charles Lewis Tiffany, had passed away. His vision for expanding the company's adornment business was different, however, than the elegant extravagance of his father's era using precious jewels obtained from European royalty.

    Tiffany's "art jewelry," as L.C. Tiffany referred to it, largely reflected the themes...MORE and styles popular during the Art Nouveau movement, the hand craftsmanship of Arts and Crafts wares, and elements gleaned from exotic objects he admired, and these melded beautifully together.

    Louis Comfort Tiffany ensured that the colors and Art Nouveau style that made his glass a form of artistry would be transferred into wearable creations. According to the Charles Hosmer Morse Musuem, he used primarily semiprecious stones and enameling in the 750 art jewelry pieces sold through his family's business. Tiffany's newly established art jewelry and existing enameling departments were closely linked as each piece of jewelry was designed and crafted with impeccable detail.

    The enamels were formed using a glass-like paste applied to metal and high heat, a process the company perfected in 1898 and also used on Tiffany's Favrile wares. These enamels offered color options for jewelry manufacture outside the norm. While Louis didn't actually create the jewelry, it was produced by talented jewelers under his supervision and some, like the peacock necklace shown above, were produced from his own design sketches.

    The peacock necklace was crafted by jeweler Julian Munson (Sherman) for exhibition between 1903 and 1906. It is now a part of the Tiffany jewelry installation at the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of Art in Winter Park, Florida. Comprised of enamel, opal, amethyst, ruby, sapphire, demantoid garnet, emerald, chrysoberyl, and gold, this is the most important existing work in this medium. The front medallion features a peacock mosaic of opals and enamels surrounded by amethysts and sapphires. According to the Morse Museum, exhibition pieces like this one were finished on both sides, and the back of this necklace features an enameled design of pink flamingos.

    See page two to view the back of the peacock necklace.

    Continue to 2 of 3 below.
  • 02 of 03

    Tiffany Peacock Necklace in Reverse

    Reverse of Louis Comfort Tiffany Peacock Necklace, ca. 1903-1906, Featuring Pink Flamingos
    Reverse of Louis Comfort Tiffany Peacock Necklace, ca. 1903-1906, Featuring Pink Flamingos. Jay B. Siegel

    This photo shows the back of the peacock necklace featuring intricately enameled pink flamingos. This exhibition piece was designed between 1903 and 1906 by Louis Comfort Tiffany and crafted by jeweler Julian Munson (Sherman). It is displayed as part of the Tiffany jewelry installation at the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of Art in Winter Park, Florida.

    See page three to view an extraordinary Tiffany jewelry design book.

    Continue to 3 of 3 below.
  • 03 of 03

    Tiffany & Co. Jewelry Design Book

    Tiffany Jewelry Design Book, ca. 1914-1933, on Display at the Morse Museum
    Tiffany Jewelry Design Book, ca. 1914-1933, on Display at the Morse Museum. Jay B. Siegel

    While the jewelry, art jewelry in particular, produced under Louis Comfort Tiffany's direction makes up a fraction of the work he is known for, this medium is significant nonetheless. In fact, Tiffany himself referred to each one of his designs as "a little missionary of art."

    His art jewelry exhibited mastery in incorporating the flowing forms and natural elements of Art Nouveau style just as he had previously conveyed through leaded glass lamps and windows. He was greatly influenced by the...MORE handcrafted jewelry of the Arts and Crafts movement made with colored gemstones as well, according to press information shared by Tiffany & Co.

    While the art jewelry itself imparts the flair of European manufacture, many of the motifs are distinctly American. These include blackberries, wild grapes and flowers, and other natural themes inspired by floral and fauna Tiffany found on the grounds of his majestic Laurelton Hall home on Long Island, where he actually held an annual "Peacock Feast." He - along with a talented team of designers, jewelers and enameling specialists - captured these elements of nature in wearable art forms using varied metals and vivid enamels along with colored precious and semiprecious gems. The peacock necklace is a prime example of this artistic expression.

    Tiffany also drew on the influences of Etruscan, Egyptian, and Moorish art he studied earlier in life during his travels in Europe and North Africa. He collected jewelry along the way ranging from ancient Greek earrings to Babylonian necklaces. Elements of these pieces, such as braided or twisted cannetille wirework first used by the Greeks to allow gemstones to be set into open spaces, can be found in some of the designs Tiffany sketched himself as well as the renderings of those who worked alongside him.

    A number of different enameling techniques considered to be "antique" in nature even in the early 1900s, including cloisonné, basse taille, champlevé, and plique-à-jour, embellished many pieces of Tiffany's art jewelry. Plique-à-jour enameling actually resembles stained glass, making it a near a perfect medium for jewelry associated with a glass master who valued the influence of light in his work like Tiffany did.

    Of course, the 750 pieces of art jewelry produced make up a small portion of the overall body of jewelry designed and sold through Tiffany & Co. at Louis Comfort Tiffany's direction from 1902-1918. Many were traditional contemporary jewelry styles in continuation of his father's vision for the company.

    The photo above offers a rare glimpse at a Tiffany jewelry design book on display as part of the Tiffany jewelry installation at the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of Art in Winter Park, Florida. The book dating from 1914-1933 belonged to designer Meta K. Overbeck who began supervising Tiffany's jewelry production in 1914. This book of design renderings - featuring drawings in watercolor, ink, and pencil on paper - is in itself a work of art.







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  • ting from 1870? Sixty dealers from five states showcased the best of the old at the three-day antique show at Harper College in Palatine. Show organizers Carol Gianopoulos...
    NEWS

    Glass use has a long history

    By Elaine Markoutsas, Universal Press Syndicate | August 11, 2002
    Glass has captivated man for thousands of years. The Phoenicians became aware of its unique properties about 5000 B.C., when they discovered a vitreous material $   L Articles about Louis Comfort Tiffany - tribunedigital-chicagotribune

    Articles about Louis Comfort Tiffany - tribunedigital-chicagotribune

    Advertisement
    IN THE NEWS

    Louis Comfort Tiffany

    FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
    • Lake Forest
    • Navy Pier
    • Glass
    • Field Museum
    • Art Deco
    • | More
    FEATURED ARTICLES
    ARTICLES BY DATE
    NEWS

    Glass Master

    By Glen Elsasser, Chicago Tribune | November 19, 1989
    The colossus of Tiffany lamps is crowned with a shade of deep red poppies, a lush indoor garden when lighted. Standing more than 6 feet tall, the lamp boasts a shade 30 inches in diameter, the largest floor model ever made by Tiffany Studios-the atelier of Louis Comfort Tiffany, artist turned artisan. For more than 50 years beginning in the late 1800s, New York-based Tiffany Studios produced tasteful items for American homes. "Until this show, no one had seen a floor lamp of such dimensions," said...
    NEWS

    Ex-Gov. Thompson to auction off office art

    By Joseph Ruzich and Stacy St. Clair, Chicago Tribune | December 5, 2013
    Former Illinois Gov. James Thompson is parting with 19 pieces of art he owns to make way for a different collection in his Loop law office. The artwork, which includes paintings, prints and sculptures that are Chicago-themed or by Chicago artists, will be up for auction Saturday at the John Toomey Gallery in Oak Park. Thompson, a partner at Winston & Strawn on Wacker Drive and longtime art collector, said the pieces to be auctioned off have made way in his office for artwork and...
    Advertisement
    NEWS

    The photograph of the stained-glass window by Louis...

    April 9, 1996
    The photograph of the stained-glass window by Louis Comfort Tiffany on the cover of the April 7 Magazine was incorrectly identified. The window is in the First Presbyterian Church of Lake Forest. The Tribune regrets the error.
    ENTERTAINMENT

    Driehaus exhibit shows off the glory of Tiffany pieces

    By Kerry Reid, Special to the Tribune | October 30, 2013
    The Gilded Age Gold Coast mansion of Samuel Mayo Nickerson, one of the founders of the First National Bank of Chicago, once served as a live-in art gallery for Nickerson and his wife, Mathilda, who donated their extensive collection of Asian art to the Art Institute in 1900. Now the home, designed and built between 1879 and 1883 by Edward J. Burling of Chicago's Burling and Whitehouse firm, serves as the lush backdrop for the decorative arts collection of Richard H....
    FEATURES

    Tiffany Treasures

    By M.W. Newman, a veteran Chicago journalist, specializes in urban and architectural affairs | April 7, 1996
    Louis Comfort Tiffany was a moneyed swell, and his middle name truly as well as figuratively was Comfort. Breakfast at Tiffany's was steamer clams, strawberries in heavy cream or both. Ever the connoisseur, he presided over a 580-acre estate on Long Island and traveled in his own railroad car. But this privileged heir to the Tiffany jewelry fortune was no dilettante. He was the great American master of art glass and church stained glass, a Renaissance throwback in seashore flannels.
    FEATURES

    A restoration drama

    BY TOM HUNDLEY | June 29, 2008
    It took some detective work--and a little urban archaeology--but the results should dispel one of the enduring myths of Chicago architecture. At the same time, they will reveal the bejeweled Tiffany dome of the Chicago Cultural Center not as many Chicagoans remember it, but as Louis Comfort Tiffany imagined it. The Tiffany dome, in the Preston Bradley Hall at the south end of the Cultural Center, has been undergoing a six-month, $2.2 million restoration...
    NEWS

    Hugh Mckean, Art Collector, Museum Chief

    May 9, 1995
    Hugh Ferguson McKean, 86, an art collector, artist, museum director and former college president, preserved a major Tiffany art collection that is in a museum in Winter Park, Fla., and which was exhibited in 1984 at the Museum of Science and Industry. A resident of Winter Park, he died Saturday at home. In 1930, his own artwork led to him studying for the summer at Laurelton Hall, the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Tiffany's work in stained glass windows, mosaics, lamps...
    NEWS

    Letters enlighten art buffs

    By Lisa Anderson, Tribune national correspondent | March 5, 2007
    Asking who designed Louis Comfort Tiffany's iconic lamps might seem the decorative art world's equivalent to the schoolyard stumper, "Who's buried in Grant's tomb?" While Ulysses S. Grant is indeed buried in Grant's tomb, fresh evidence reveals that Tiffany did not design most of the lavish leaded-glass lamps bearing his name, solving a century-old mystery art historians didn't even know existed. So, whodunit? Clara Pierce Wolcott Driscoll did it. And she, and the 35 women who worked under her...
    TRAVEL

    Stretch Your Mind At A New Museum

    By Michael Kilian, Tribune Staff Writer | April 2, 2000
    The nation's newest modern art museum -- the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art in Florida -- has just opened with an electrifying inaugural exhibition of mind-stretching artworks that use not only film and video but an altogether revolutionary medium: time itself. Called "Making Time: Considering Time as a Material in Contemporary Video and Film," the sound and light show features highly unusual pieces by such modern masters as Andy Warhol, Nam June Paik and Bruce Nauman.
    NEWS

    Funeral to be ecumenical

    By Glen Elsasser, Special to the Tribune | September 7, 2005
    The funeral of Chief Justice William Rehnquist will be an ecumenical service Wednesday in St. Matthew the Apostle Catholic Cathedral, an architectural gem that reflects the new cosmopolitan taste of the late 19th Century. Semi-precious stones decorate the white marble main altar, which came from the archbishop of Agra, India, the home of the fabled Taj Mahal, a 17th Century mausoleum. An inlaid marble plaque in front of the sanctuary gates commemorates the funeral mass of President John Kennedy in...
    NEWS

    Navy Pier gets touch of glass

    By Stan Donaldson, Tribune staff reporter | June 25, 2003
    A new exhibit of 18 Tiffany windows from old churches, cemeteries and private homes opened at Navy Pier Tuesday in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows. The collection features the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the late 19th Century and early 20th Century artist, said Rolf Achilles, curator for the museum. "What we have gathered here is one of the great collections in the United States of landscape, figurative windows and generic windows if you will, the kind that Tiffany made his fame...
    TRAVEL

    Cheap British bus A new no-frills bus service...

    By From Tribune news services | July 25, 2004
    Cheap British bus A new no-frills bus service, Megabus.com, has been introduced in Britain with the lowest fare being 1 pound (about $1.85) for a single journey on any route. Reservations must be made online. From London, stops include Oxford, Brighton and Plymouth. Megabus also has services in Scotland from Edinburgh and Glasgow, and in the north of England from Manchester to London. The network uses double-decker buses bought from a previous business in Hong Kong. Toilets...
    NEWS

    Tiffany windows added to Smith Museum display at Navy Pier

    June 25, 2003
    A new exhibit of 18 Tiffany windows from old churches, cemeteries and private homes opened at Navy Pier on Tuesday in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows. The collection features the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the late 19th Century and early 20th Century artist, said Rolf Achilles, curator for the museum. "What we have gathered here is one of the great collections in the United States of landscape, figurative windows and generic windows if you will, the...
    NEWS

    Navy Pier gets touch of glass

    By Stan Donaldson, Tribune staff reporter | June 25, 2003
    A new exhibit of 18 Tiffany windows from old churches, cemeteries and private homes opened at Navy Pier Tuesday in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows. The collection features the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the late 19th Century and early 20th Century artist, said Rolf Achilles, curator for the museum. "What we have gathered here is one of the great collections in the United States of landscape, figurative windows and generic windows if you will, the kind that Tiffany made his fame...
    NEWS

    Glass through history

    By Elaine Markoutsas, Universal Press Syndicate | September 1, 2002
    Glass has captivated man for thousands of years. The Phoenicians became aware of its unique properties about 5000 B.C., when they discovered a vitreous material left from melted blocks of nitrate mixed with sand, a result of fires they lit to cook. Glass beads were known in Egypt around 3500 B.C. The technique of glass blowing is attributed to the Syrians, but the Romans made it an art. Today, collectors of ancient Roman glass vessels marvel at their extraordinary color, mostly iridescent blues...
    NEWS

    Tiffany windows added to Smith Museum display at Navy Pier

    June 25, 2003
    A new exhibit of 18 Tiffany windows from old churches, cemeteries and private homes opened at Navy Pier on Tuesday in the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows. The collection features the work of Louis Comfort Tiffany, the late 19th Century and early 20th Century artist, said Rolf Achilles, curator for the museum. "What we have gathered here is one of the great collections in the United States of landscape, figurative windows and generic windows if you will, the...