1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Tiffany, Charles Lewis - Wikisource, the free online library charles lewis tiffany

1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Tiffany, Charles Lewis

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TIFFANY, CHARLES LEWIS (1812-1902), American jeweler, was born at Killingly, Connecticut, on the 15th of February 1812. At fifteen he became a clerk in his father's store, but removed to New York City in 1837, and with John B. Young opened a fancy goods store. In 1847 the firm began to manufacture gold jewelry, and in 1848, when the political unrest in Europe caused great depreciation in the price of precious stones, Tiffany invested heavily in diamonds, which were sold at a great profit a few years later. The firm became Tiffany, Young & Ellis in 1841 and was reorganized as Tiffany & Company (Mr Young and Mr Ellis retiring) in 1853. In 1851 the firm had established the sterling silver standard of .925 fine, subsequently adopted by other jewelers; and in the same year had founded a branch house in Paris. In 1858 Tiffany bought the unused portion of the Atlantic telegraph cable which he made into cane handles or sold in sections. At the beginning of the Civil War, foreseeing that the jewelry business would suffer, he turned most of his capital to the manufacture of swords, medals and similar war material. In 1868 the company was incorporated, and branches were established at London and at Geneva. Tiffany made a speciality of importing historic gems, jewelry and art works, and in 1887 bought some of the crown jewels of France, paying for them about half a million dollars. He was made a chevalier of the Legion of Honour in 1878. He died in New York on the 18th of February 1902.

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Tag: Charles Lewis Tiffany

Tiffany & Co.

A Mystery Writer’s Almanac—Bait for Criminals

charleslouistiffany

On this day in 1812, Charles Lewis Tiffany is born.  With a partner he begins a stationery and fancy goods store in 1837 in Lower Manhattan.  By 1841 the store is manufacturing its own line of jewelry, and in 1853—having assumed control of the business—Tiffany shifts the business’s emphasis to jewelry.  The rest, as they say, is history—all wrapped up in a distinctive robin’s-egg blue box.

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Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past

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    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
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    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
    • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
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    • Tiffany & Co. is celebrating its 175th anniversary. At left is the Tiffany Setting Engagement Ring, a design classic. The diamond is held away from the band by six prongs, which allows more light through the stone.

      Diamonds represent about a quarter of Tiffany & Co.'s $3.6 billion in annual sales.

      Credit: Carlton Davis, courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Using a $1,000 loan, Charles Lewis Tiffany and John B. Young opened a stationery and dry goods store on Broadway in Lower Manhattan in 1837. Young soon bowed out, but Tiffany proved to be a marketing genius. He hired some of the best American silversmiths, whose sumptuous pieces started winning international prizes and can now be found in the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art.

      By the mid-1800s, Tiffany jewelry was all the rage.

      (Left: Jean Schlumberger's finished Plumes necklace of diamonds and colored gemstones.)

      Credit: Carlton Davis, courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Company founder Charles Lewis Tiffany is seen at his Union Square store c. 1899, at the age of 87. He is with Charles T. Cook, who took over the company's leadership after Tiffany died in 1902.

      Credit: The Jewelers' Circular

    • The original cash book records show Tiffany & Co.'s first-day sales of $4.98.

      Credit: Kenro Izu; courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Charles Lewis Tiffany (1812-1902), the co-founder of Tiffany & Co.

      Credit: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Paulding Farnham's original drawing of the Aztec collar, designed for the 1900 Paris Exposition.

      Credit: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co. Archives

    • Paloma Picasso's drawing of her Octagon pendant with notes, as sketched on hotel stationery.

      Credit: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • A seed pearl necklace and brooch purchased by President Abraham Lincoln for his wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, for the Inaugural Ball of 1861.

      Even Abraham Lincoln knew just where to buy seed pearls for his wife to wear at his inauguration. According to legend, Lincoln asked Charles Tiffany if the President of the United States got a discount. The reply: "I'm terribly sorry, but no one gets a discount at Tiffany and Co."

      Credit: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • A diamond and emerald brooch from Tiffany's, a purchase of the French Crown Jewels, dated 1878.

      Credit: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Tiffany engagement rings, in platinum and 18 karat yellow gold. Clockwise from top: Tiffany Setting, the Jean Schlumberger Rope ring, the Tiffany Novo, the Tiffany Bezet, the Tiffany Legacy, the Lucida, a cushion-cut yellow diamond ring, the Jean Schlumberger engagement ring, and the Tiffany Embrace.

      Credit: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Lady Bird Johnson worked closely with Tiffany's in the design of White House china, which incorporated hand-painted wildflowers.

      Credit: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Earrings of fancy intense yellow diamonds framed by brilliant-cut diamonds in platinum, inspired by a 1925 design.

      Credit: Carlton Davis, courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Designer Jean Schlumberger's sketch for his Lotus bracelet of paillonne enamel, diamonds, sapphires, lapis lazuli and 18 karat gold.

      Credit: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • The Lotus bracelet with paillonne enamel, 18k gold vines and leaves, platinum-set diamond and lapis lazuli seedpods and cabochon sapphires, by Jean Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co.

      Credit: Carlton Davis, courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Tiffany enameled orchid brooches with diamonds in 18 karat gold.

      Credit: Carlton Davis, courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Paloma Picasso's Graffiti pin in diamonds and 18 karat gold, and Love & Kisses bracelet in sterling silver.

      Credit: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Tiffany locks pictured on an oval link bracelet, from left: Vintage lock in sterling silver and 18 karat rose gold; heart lock in 18 karat rose gold; arc lock in sterling silver; emblem lock in 18 karat yellow gold; and round lock in sterling silver.

      Credit: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Paloma's Zellige diamond and caenelian ring in 18 karat yellow gold by Paloma Picasso for Tiffany & Co.

      Credit: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Atlas Diamond Ring in 18k white gold; the Atlas Diamond Open Circle Pendant in 18k white gold; and the Atlas Diamond Bar Pendant in 18k white gold.

      Credit: Carlton Davis. courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • The Loving Heart pendant in 18k white gold with diamonds by Paloma Picasso for Tiffany & Co.

      Credit: Courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Tiffany morganite and diamond pendants in 18 karat rose gold and platinum, from left: Briolette drop pendant, and oval pendant.

      Credit: Carlton Davis, courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Oiseau de Paradis clip with aquamarine, emerald, amethyst, diamond, and sapphires set in platinum and 18 karat yellow gold by Jean Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co.

      Credit: Carlton Davis, courtesy of Tiffany & Co.

    • Elsa Peretti Doughnut bangles in lacquer, sterling silver and 18 karat gold.

      Credit: Josh Haskin, courtesy of Tiffany & Co.







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    Elsa Peretti Doughnut bangles in lacquer, sterling silver and 18 karat gold.

    Credit: Josh Haskin, courtesy of Tiffany & Co.







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  • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past
  • Tiffany at 175: A jeweled past

    1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Tiffany, Charles Lewis - Wikisource, the free online library charles lewis tiffany

    1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Tiffany, Charles Lewis

    From Wikisource
    < 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica
    Jump to: navigation, search