Tiffany Reaches Settlement With Mother on Emancipation Petition - latimes tiffany singer

Tiffany Reaches Settlement With Mother on Emancipation Petition

June 10, 1988|DENNIS McDOUGAL | Times Staff Writer

Teen-age pop star Tiffany dropped her petition to emancipate herself from her mot tqitkmpo. tiffany dockaher's legal guardianship Thursday, but it is doubtful that she will be returning home anytime soon.

According to attorneys for the mother, Janie C. Williams, the only reason the 16-year-old singer tentatively agreed to settle was that Williams threatened to force an expensive trial on the question of whether Tiffany can act as an adult.

"Our biggest regret is that the settlement, which Mrs. Williams proposed immediately upon (Tiffany's) filing of the petition of emancipation, could only be consummated upon the threat of trial," said Williams' attorney, Neal Goldstein.

While the half-dozen attorneys met privately in Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Richard Hubbell's chambers to hammer out final details to end the 3-month legal battle, the two sat on opposite sides of the courtroom and would not look at each other.

Hubbell said he wanted the agreement in writing by today, but it will not be completed until next week, according to attorneys.

The agreement will not sever relations between mother and daughter, but it will keep them at a legal distance from each other in financial, contractual and personal matters, lawyers said.

Williams is recognized as Tiffany's legal guardian under the settlement, but points of disagreement between the two still must be resolved by three attorneys: one chosen by Tiffany, one selected by her mother and a third neutral attorney nominated by the two lawyers who represent mother and daughter.

Daughter's Debut

Williams alleged in court declarations that George Tobin, the producer of her daughter's debut MCA album, which has sold over 5 million copies, has tied her daughter to unfair management and production contracts that give the bulk of her profits to Tobin.

She also alleged that Tobin urged Tiffany to petition for emancipation. Tobin, who was not in court Thursday, has denied the allegations.

The red-haired pop singer--whose full name is Tiffany Renee Darwish--has been living with her paternal grandmother in La Mirada since leaving home last March 7. She will continue to have the option to stay in La Mirada or go home to her mother's Norwalk apartment under the agreement. But neither side believed the gap between mother and daughter would be repaired anytime soon.

Tiffany's traveling companion when she is out of town on her frequent personal appearance tours has been her aunt and temporary guardian, Julie Abbas. While Williams will resume the status of legal guardian, Abbas will continue to travel with the singer, according to Tiffany's attorney, John Frankenheimer.

Because part of the settlement agreement between mother and daughter is that no specific terms be disclosed, Frankenheimer said he could not reveal money, custody or contractual details.

"She's pleased with the result," Frankenheimer said of the young recording artist.

According to Frankenheimer, the settlement calls on Tiffany to hire her own financial and legal advisers, separate from her mother's advisers.

"She sought a stable and orderly environment in which to conduct her business, and she's satisfied that she has that in place," he said.

"Jane Williams believes that the agreement will foster reestablishment of a relationship with her daughter, which she believes was only interfered with because of the intervention of outsiders," Goldstein said.

Seizure Led to FloJo's Death

His 104 scores make his case

Restaurant review: South Beverly Grill

Brutal Murder by Teen-Age Girls Adds to Britons' Shock

Comaneci Confirms Suicide Attempt, Magazine Says


tiffany singer

tiffany e co new york
braccialetto tiffany
tiffany atlas
tiffany butik lokaliserare
tiffanys ringar

Jazz Vocalist Issues A Convincing Calling Card With 'Nothing But Soul'

Jazz Vocalist Issues A Convincing Calling Card With 'Nothing But Soul'

Listen · 7:11
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/435520724/435545527" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In her debut album, Tiffany Austin puts her own improvisational, jazzy spin on songs by the late composer Hoagy Carmichael. Critic Kevin Whitehead calls Austin "a singer to keep an ear on."

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Bay Area jazz vocalist Tiffany Austin spent five and a half years singing in Japan then returned to the States to go to law school. But once she had her diploma, she went back to singing. Her debut album features many songs by the great songwriter Hoagy Carmichael who, by the way, also had a law degree. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead has a review.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SKYLARK")

TIFFANY AUSTIN: (Singing) Skylark, have you anything to say to me? Can you tell me where love can be? Is there a meadow in the mist where someone's waiting to be kissed?

KEVIN WHITEHEAD, BYLINE: Tiffany Austin on Hoagy Carmichael and Johnny Mercer's "Skylark" from her debut "Nothing But Soul." The album title comes from a song she doesn't do, the '60s Betty Carter vehicle "Jazz Ain't Nothing But Soul." Austin takes that advisory to heart. Based in Tokyo for years, she sang jazz, pop and gospel on a variety of gigs, and she can modulate her vocal quality from sweet to dusky to raspy like there's more than one singer in there. But Austin will also fuse all those trains. She has improviser's urge to personalize a melody, gospel fervor, and a pop singer's direct way with a lyric.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BALTIMORE ORIOLE")

AUSTIN: (Singing) Baltimore oriole, messed around with that big mouth 'til he singed her wings. Forgiving is easy - oh yeah, 'cause sometimes it's one of them womanlike and happen type of things. So send her back home 'cause home ain't home without her warbling. We'd make a lonely man happy. Baltimore oriole.

WHITEHEAD: The ballad "Baltimore Oriole" and Tiffany Austin's backbeat arrangement. She does six Hoagy Carmichael tunes on "Nothing But Soul," tweaking a couple of the better known ones because it's not like you can harm a song taking a weird approach. When you're done it's still good as new. Austin splits arranging duties with her producer and tenor saxophonist, Bay Area band leader Howard Wiley. He gives one evergreen an archaic two-beat bounce.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "STARDUST")

AUSTIN: (Singing) And now the purple dust of twilight time lingers over meadows of my heart. High up in the sky, the little stars climb, always reminding me that we're apart.

WHITEHEAD: That's "Stardust," of course. Howard Wiley's jocular arrangement teeters on the edge of being too cute, but Austin keeps it grounded. Your ear stays focused on her, and she is not kidding.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "STARDUST")

AUSTIN: (Singing) When our love was new and every kiss an inspiration. But that was long ago. Now my consolation is in the stardust of a song.

WHITEHEAD: Hoagie Carmichael didn't compose everything on Tiffany Austin's new album. There are a couple of standards he recorded once but aren't associated with him. One of those is by another iconic American singer-songwriter and occasional screen actor, Mr. Johnny Cash.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I WALK THE LINE")

AUSTIN: (Singing) Sure as night is dark and every day is light, I keep you on my mind all day and night. Happiness, I've known is proven that it's right. 'Cause you're mine, I walk that line.

WHITEHEAD: Glen Pearson on piano. That is way better than Hoagy Carmichael's version of "I Walk The Line," and it suggests other avenues Tiffany Austin might explore. Her debut album clocks in at a short-ish 40 minutes and even then, a couple of pieces feel a little like filler. But the best of it is a convincing calling card. She's got that flexible voice, excellent pitch and rhythm, and she can weave her own line around a melody and still let you hear the original behind it. That is more than enough to make Austin a singer to keep an ear on.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I GET ALONG WITHOUT YOU VERY WELL")

AUSTIN: (Singing) I get along without you very well - of course I do, except perhaps in spring. But I should never think of spring for that would surely break my heart - my heart - my heart in two.

BIANCULLI: Kevin Whitehead writes for Point of Departure and is the author of "Why Jazz?" He reviewed "Nothing But Soul," the new album by singer Tiffany Austin.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.



irst-para" class="mod-latarticlesarticletextwithadcpc mod-latarticlesarticletext mod-articletext">

Hubbell said he wanted the agreement in writing by today, but it will not be completed until next week, according to attorneys.

The agreement will not sever relations between mother and daughter, but it will keep them at a legal distance from each other in financial, contractual and personal matters, lawyers said.

Williams is recognized as Tiffany's legal guardian under the settlement, but points of disagreement between the two still must be resolved by three attorneys: one chosen by Tiffany, one selected by her mother and a third neutral attorney nominated by the two lawyers who represent mother and daughter.

Daughter's Debut

Williams alleged in court declarations that George Tobin, the producer of her daughter's debut MCA album, which has sold over 5 million copies, has tied her daughter to unfair management and production contracts that give the bulk of her profits to Tobin.

She also alleged that Tobin urged Tiffany to petition for emancipation. Tobin, who was not in court Thursday, has denied the allegations.

The red-haired pop singer--whose full name is Tiffany Renee Darwish--has been living with her paternal grandmother in La Mirada since leaving home last March 7. She will continue to have the option to stay in La Mirada or go home to her mother's Norwalk apartment under the agreement. But neither side believed the gap between mother and daughter would be repaired anytime soon.

Tiffany's traveling companion when she is out of town on heršoEiii¼ tiffany singer Tiffany Reaches Settlement With Mother on Emancipation Petition - latimes tqitkmpo

Tiffany Reaches Settlement With Mother on Emancipation Petition - latimes tiffany singer

Tiffany Reaches Settlement With Mother on Emancipation Petition

June 10, 1988|DENNIS McDOUGAL | Times Staff Writer

Teen-age pop star Tiffany dropped her petition to emancipate herself from her mot tqitkmpo. tiffany dockaher's legal guardianship Thursday, but it is doubtful that she will be returning home anytime soon.

According to attorneys for the mother, Janie C. Williams, the only reason the 16-year-old singer tentatively agreed to settle was that Williams threatened to force an expensive trial on the question of whether Tiffany can act as an adult.

"Our biggest regret is that the settlement, which Mrs. Williams proposed immediately upon (Tiffany's) filing of the petition of emancipation, could only be consummated upon the threat of trial," said Williams' attorney, Neal Goldstein.

While the half-dozen attorneys met privately in Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Richard Hubbell's chambers to hammer out final details to end the 3-month legal battle, the two sat on opposite sides of the courtroom and would not look at each other.

Hubbell said he wanted the agreement in writing by today, but it will not be completed until next week, according to attorneys.

The agreement will not sever relations between mother and daughter, but it will keep them at a legal distance from each other in financial, contractual and personal matters, lawyers said.

Williams is recognized as Tiffany's legal guardian under the settlement, but points of disagreement between the two still must be resolved by three attorneys: one chosen by Tiffany, one selected by her mother and a third neutral attorney nominated by the two lawyers who represent mother and daughter.

Daughter's Debut

Williams alleged in court declarations that George Tobin, the producer of her daughter's debut MCA album, which has sold over 5 million copies, has tied her daughter to unfair management and production contracts that give the bulk of her profits to Tobin.

She also alleged that Tobin urged Tiffany to petition for emancipation. Tobin, who was not in court Thursday, has denied the allegations.

The red-haired pop singer--whose full name is Tiffany Renee Darwish--has been living with her paternal grandmother in La Mirada since leaving home last March 7. She will continue to have the option to stay in La Mirada or go home to her mother's Norwalk apartment under the agreement. But neither side believed the gap between mother and daughter would be repaired anytime soon.

Tiffany's traveling companion when she is out of town on her frequent personal appearance tours has been her aunt and temporary guardian, Julie Abbas. While Williams will resume the status of legal guardian, Abbas will continue to travel with the singer, according to Tiffany's attorney, John Frankenheimer.

Because part of the settlement agreement between mother and daughter is that no specific terms be disclosed, Frankenheimer said he could not reveal money, custody or contractual details.

"She's pleased with the result," Frankenheimer said of the young recording artist.

According to Frankenheimer, the settlement calls on Tiffany to hire her own financial and legal advisers, separate from her mother's advisers.

"She sought a stable and orderly environment in which to conduct her business, and she's satisfied that she has that in place," he said.

"Jane Williams believes that the agreement will foster reestablishment of a relationship with her daughter, which she believes was only interfered with because of the intervention of outsiders," Goldstein said.

Seizure Led to FloJo's Death

His 104 scores make his case

Restaurant review: South Beverly Grill

Brutal Murder by Teen-Age Girls Adds to Britons' Shock

Comaneci Confirms Suicide Attempt, Magazine Says


tiffany singer

tiffany e co new york
braccialetto tiffany
tiffany atlas
tiffany butik lokaliserare
tiffanys ringar

Jazz Vocalist Issues A Convincing Calling Card With 'Nothing But Soul'

Jazz Vocalist Issues A Convincing Calling Card With 'Nothing But Soul'

Listen · 7:11
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/435520724/435545527" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In her debut album, Tiffany Austin puts her own improvisational, jazzy spin on songs by the late composer Hoagy Carmichael. Critic Kevin Whitehead calls Austin "a singer to keep an ear on."

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Bay Area jazz vocalist Tiffany Austin spent five and a half years singing in Japan then returned to the States to go to law school. But once she had her diploma, she went back to singing. Her debut album features many songs by the great songwriter Hoagy Carmichael who, by the way, also had a law degree. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead has a review.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SKYLARK")

TIFFANY AUSTIN: (Singing) Skylark, have you anything to say to me? Can you tell me where love can be? Is there a meadow in the mist where someone's waiting to be kissed?

KEVIN WHITEHEAD, BYLINE: Tiffany Austin on Hoagy Carmichael and Johnny Mercer's "Skylark" from her debut "Nothing But Soul." The album title comes from a song she doesn't do, the '60s Betty Carter vehicle "Jazz Ain't Nothing But Soul." Austin takes that advisory to heart. Based in Tokyo for years, she sang jazz, pop and gospel on a variety of gigs, and she can modulate her vocal quality from sweet to dusky to raspy like there's more than one singer in there. But Austin will also fuse all those trains. She has improviser's urge to personalize a melody, gospel fervor, and a pop singer's direct way with a lyric.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BALTIMORE ORIOLE")

AUSTIN: (Singing) Baltimore oriole, messed around with that big mouth 'til he singed her wings. Forgiving is easy - oh yeah, 'cause sometimes it's one of them womanlike and happen type of things. So send her back home 'cause home ain't home without her warbling. We'd make a lonely man happy. Baltimore oriole.

WHITEHEAD: The ballad "Baltimore Oriole" and Tiffany Austin's backbeat arrangement. She does six Hoagy Carmichael tunes on "Nothing But Soul," tweaking a couple of the better known ones because it's not like you can harm