A magical Christmas Tiffany & Co. horse carriage ride in Paris

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Have you ever wonder how celebrating Christmas in a Tiffany & Co.  old fashioned horse drawn carriage was?

Nobody celebrates the Christmas season like Tiffany & Co.! On December 13th 2014, Tiffany & Co. brought an extra sprinkle to Christmas on the streets of Paris. I was invited to enjoy a special ride in the Tiffany & Co. horse carriage. The horse carriage was conveying the Christmas’ magic with Paris’ charm and romanticism.

Personne ne célèbre la saison de Noël comme Tiffany & Co.! Le 13 Décembre 2014, Tiffany & Co. ont fait des étincelles pour Noël dans les rues de Paris. J’ai été invité pour une balade spéciale dans la calèche Tiffany & Co.. La calèche transmettait la magie de Noël avec le charme et le romantisme de Paris.

If you were doing your Christmas shopping around the Champs Elysées and the Place Vendôme, you might have noticed this beautiful carriage made of the iconic Tiffany blue and the back of the carriage was packed of the famous blue boxes. I can say that this carriage did not go unnoticed as it was attracting photographers, Christmas shoppers and Tiffany & Co. connoisseurs. Remember: “the perfect holiday comes wrapped in blue…”

Si vous faisiez vos courses de Noël sur les Champs Elysées et  la Place Vendôme, vous avez sans doute remarqué cette belle calèche recouverte de l’emblématique couleur bleue Tiffany et l’arrière du calèche remplit des iconiques boîtes bleues. Je peux dire que cette calèche n’est pas passée inaperçu car elle attirait les photographes, les acheteurs de Noël et les connaisseurs de Tiffany & Co. Rappelez-vous: “des vacances parfaites sont enveloppés en bleu …”

Tiffany will never disappoint you! I would like to thank Lucie and Christine for having me. I had an amazing time meeting you all and visiting the two beautiful stores. If you are in Paris do not forget to stop by the Tiffany & Co. boutiques:

TIFFANY & CO.

6 rue de la Paix

75002 PARIS

TIFFANY & CO.

62 avenue des Champs Elysées

75008 PARIS

 

Check out my “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” article from last year. PS: I wish you all Happy Holidays! Love you <3…

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  • An Afternoon With Tiffany and Co: Horse Carriage Ride
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Blog, Dalabooh, Events, Jewelry Blog mode, blogueuse mode geneve, Breakfast at Tiffany and Co, Champs Elysees, dalabooh, Dalabooh.com, Horse Carriage, paris, Paris fashion Blog, Place Vendome, Tiffany & Co. Paris, Tiffany and Co

Alice C.

One Comment

  1. Reply
    Rathana

    Ohhh how pretty and beautiful carriage, love it!
    Hope you had wonderful holidays. And a little delayed: Happy New Year! id="module-taboola-thumbs-recirc">

    Featured in Moneywatch

    • Is Tiffany & Co. Amazon-proof? - CBS News tiffany and co paris

      Is Tiffany & Co. Amazon-proof?

      Though many major American retailers have had their foundations shaken by Amazon (AMZN) and the wider explosion in e-commerce, Tiffany & Co. (TIF) appears to be a rare diamond in the rough of brick-and-mortar retail. 

      Exhibit A: The company's stock price has jumped nearly 30 percent over the last year, even as department stores like Macy's (M), J.C. Penney (JCP) and Sears struggle with shrinking growth.

      Analysts point to several reasons why Tiffany's, despite a recent dip in sales, remains in favor among investors. Those include the touch-and-feel experience of shopping for fine jewelry, the company's potent brand, and a global, and well-heeled, customer base.

      Another advantage is Tiffany's small physical footprint of 125 stores in the U.S. and roughly 300 total worldwide. Its stores also are in upscale malls, which have been less affected by the mass department store closings that have affected other malls. 

      That helps keep Tiffany's operating costs low and its stores churning out profits, with sales of around $2,600 per square foot in 2016 and a sparkling 62 percent gross profit margin.

      Like other retailers, of course, Tiffany must cope with the impact of e-commerce and, as ever, the changing tastes of consumers. To that end, it recently named Alessandro Bogliolo, a veteran of luxury retail who is known for his ability to revamp brands like Bulgari, as its new CEO.

      As with many luxury retailers, Tiffany also is looking to add millennial buyers that may be more interested in experiences and paying down student loans than spending on big-ticket jewelry. The trick is to attract younger shoppers while maintaining its core high-end client.

      One way to appeal to younger buyers is by offering lower-priced fashion jewelry, which does not include gemstones and carries a lower price tag than fine gemstone jewelry. The fashion jewelry category was responsible for 33 percent of Tiffany's sales in 2016.  

      Edward Jones analyst Brian Yarbrough said the company must be cautious about not devaluing its brand. While having different price points opens the door to a different mix of consumers, "You have to be careful -- they had this problem in the early 90s… People who are buying $20,000 or $30,000 pieces don't want teens running around," he said.

      Retail consultant Howard Davidowitz, CEO of Davidowitz & Associates, said that for Tiffany to retain the luxury customer, the company might consider looking to do an offshoot for fashion jewelry or acquire a brand like Pandora to appeal to a different kind of consumer.

      "If you have a store and you load the store up with a lot of middle-level merchandise because you are trying to sell to tourists and everyone else, they are going to want to buy a small item and get the Tiffany bag. If you do that, you are a going to lose luxury customers.  I don't think there's any way to do it unless you can come up with a store within a store strategy -- there is clarity in that." he told CBS MoneyWatch.