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Louis Comfort Tiffany

Project about Louis Comfort Tiffany for Art Appreciation class
by

Reyna Valenzuela

on 5 May 2011

Comments (0)

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Transcript of Louis Comfort Tiffany

Louis Comfort Tiffany Louis Comfort Tiffany (born Feb. 18, 1848; died Jan. 17, 1933) was an American painter, craftsman, philanthropist, decorator, and designer. He was internationally recognized as one of the greatest forces of the Art Nouveau style, who made significant contributions to the art of glassmaking. The son of the famous jeweler Charles Lewis Tiffany, Louis studied under the American painters George Inness and Samuel Colman and also trained as a painter of narrative subjects in Paris. That he was also influenced by a visit to Morocco is evident in some of his major works. Returning to the United States, he became a recognized painter and an associate of the National Academy of Design, New York City; later he reacted against the Academy's conservatism by organizing, in 1877. Tiffany's experiments with stained glass, begun in 1875, led to the establishment, three years later, of his own glassmaking factory in Queens, New York City. By the 1890s he was a leading glass producer, experimenting with unique means of colouring. He became internationally famous for the glass that he named “Favrile.” His Favrile glass was admired abroad, especially in central Europe, where it created a new fashion. Having established a decorating firm known as Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, which served wealthy New Yorkers, Tiffany was commissioned by President Chester A. Arthur to redecorate the reception rooms at the White House, for which he created the great stained-glass screen in the entrance hall. He designed the chapel for the World's Columbian Exposition (1893) in Chicago and the high altar in the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York City.

"Louis (Comfort) Tiffany Biography (1848 - 1933)." Biography. A&E Television Networks, 2011. Web. 20 Apr 2011. <http://www.biography.com/articles/Louis-Comfort-Tiffany-9507399?part=1>. Title: Magnolias & Irises
Artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany
Date: c. 1908 Title: Hibiscus & Parrots
Artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany
Date: c. 1910 - 20 Title: Dogwood
Artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany
Date: c. 1900 - 15 Title: View of Oyster Bay
Artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany
Date: 1908 Title: Autumn Landscape
Artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany
Date: 1923 - 24 Title: Window
Artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany
Date: c. 1900 Tiffany's aesthetic was based on his conviction that nature should be the primary source of design inspiration. Intoxicated by color, he translated into glass the lush palette found in flowers and plants. This fascination with nature and with extending the capabilities of the medium led to the exploration of another technique—in 1893 Tiffany introduced his first blown-glass vases and bowls, called "Favrile," whose name, was taken from an old English word for hand made. Favrile glass quickly gained international renown for its surface iridescence and brilliant colors.
"Louis Comfort Tiffany." The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art. Charles Hosmer Morse Foundation, Inc., 25 Apr 2011. Web. 27 Apr 2011.
Tiffany typically chose the subject of the River of Life for memorial stained glass windows. He utilized every available type of glass and technique to give this window extraordinary verisimilitude. He used mottled glass to recreate sunlight filtering through yellow and orange leaves. To add realism to the leaves, he used Confetti glass embedded with paper-thin flakes of glass. He also used marbleized glass simulates the large gray and white boulders. Textured ripple glass was used to create movement in the water. He also created the impression of distant mountain peaks in the background. TIffany often picked landscape as an alternate subject to memorial windows. Here he presents the River of Life once again with the slender stream that zig-zags through the mountains and flowing into a body of water in the middle of the work. He typically would show the religious significance of the natural world in his memorial stained glass windows. In the foreground, you can see a lot of irises and two magnolia trees which illustrate the properties of the glass Tiffany was known for. He would manipulate the glass while in the semimolten state to simulate the texture of the magnolia blossom. This piece was originally installed in a mausoleum in Brooklyn, New York. Tiffany uses rippling glass to give life and texture to the petals of the dogwood. The tree itself is the main subject of this stained glass window which is depicted when it is in full bloom. In the lower half, landscape is incorporated and above the dogwood the sky is depicted. This is an asymmetrical composition that depicts Tiffany's interest in Japanese art and is believed to have been originally intended to have a second piece that was suppose to show a fall scene. This stained glass window looks like it has a frame formed by the vines. It was executed in 1908 for William C. Skinner's New York home which he shared with his sister Belle. An entry in Skinner's diary mentions that the window was installed in the house for the foyer and stairway. It's called the View of Oyster Bay because of the pale colored water scene. It's been believed that the water scene is based on a shoreline near Tiffany's summer home and the vines are based on some flowering vines surrounding Skinner's home. The theme in this window like his others is nature. In this stained glass window, Tiffany depicts hibiscus flowers and parrots. Tiffany's favorite subject to portray in his stained glass windows was anything relating to nature. The glass he uses creates vibrant colors and effects to the subject he depicts. In the foreground, the hibiscus and parrots are displayed and in the background you can see landscape being displayed with pale green and dark green colors. Here two columns are displayed with vines of intricate detail in the foreground. The color of the columns makes them stand out compared to the blues, oranges, and greens displayed in the background and framing of the window. Here he continues to display nature and landscape in the window which is a popular theme in his stained glass artworks.
Full transcript

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View More Items from Art, Collectibles, Jewelry & More

Louis Comfort Tiffany Favrile Glass Bud Vase

Saturday, June 24th 2017 @ 7:07pm EDT

Ended

Saturday, June 24th 2017 @ 7:07pm EDT

Ended

Final Bid

$190

19 Bids (View History)

Item Details

A Favrile glass vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany. This diminutive piece features a slightly flaring rim above an ovoid body with s-scrolling molded ornamentation. It has displays the opalescent sheen above a golden orange base. It is marked underneath “Q7119” and “LCT”.

VIEW TERMS & CONDITIONS

Condition

Good

- light surface scratches consistent with use, no chips or cracks, good condition

Dimensions

1.5" W x 1.75" H x 1.5" D

Item #

17STA038-026

Categories

  • Art Glass
  • Art
  • Décor
  • Vases
  • Other Home Décor


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Louis Comfort Tiffany: Celebrating Innovation

February 18, 2015 Joyce

 On this day in 1848, Louis Comfort Tiffany was born in New York City to Charles Lewis Tiffany, the founder of the renowned Tiffany & Co. Louis Comfort Tiffany forged his own artistic path, separate from the diamond jewelry legacy of his father, and became one of the most notable America designers in the Art Nouveau and Aesthetic movements. Tiffany began his artistic career as a painter but by 1875 he had become interested in glassmaking, working at several glasshouses in Brooklyn until 1877. He founded Louis Comfort Tiffany and Associated American Artists in 1879 with three notable American designers: Candace Wheeler (the “mother of interior design” and first American woman interior and textile designer), Samuel Colman and Lockwood de Forest.

During the height of Louis Comfort Tiffany and Associated American Artists,  the company oversaw such important interior design projects as the Mark Twain House in Hartford, Connecticut. Most notably, the firm was commissioned by President Chester Arthur in 1881 to completely redecorate the state rooms of the White House. Tiffany worked on the East Room, the Blue Room, the Red Room, the State Dining Room and the Entrance Hall. He refurnished the rooms, repainting the walls with decorative patterns and adding wallpaper with densely ornate Aesthetic designs, and adding Tiffany glass to the light fixtures, as well as an opalescent floor-to-ceiling glass screen in the Entrance Hall. The Tiffany renovations were lost in 1902 when President Theodore Roosevelt restored the White House interiors to their original Federal style. (Some surviving period photographs showing the Tiffany renovations can be seen at the White House Museum).

By 1885, Tiffany had turned his attention almost exclusively to glassmaking and dissolved Louis Comfort Tiffany and Associated American Artists . He founded his first glass factory in 1892, naming it  Tiffany Studios , and proceeded to embark on a highly celebrated and innovative career in fine glassmaking. His constant drive to develop new techniques while exploring and expanding upon traditional methods led to some of the period’s most notable works of decorative art.

Louis Comfort Tiffany admired the lustrous iridescence of ancient Roman glass; these optical effects were caused by mineral impurities not found in finer glass. Other glassmakers were reluctant to include these mineral impurities so Tiffany began making his own glass, deliberately introducing these impure materials for their luminous effect. Tiffany transformed the process of creating stained glass by using opalescent art glass in a variety of colors and textures, cut to the desired size, and edged in copper foil; each copper foil edged piece was then soldered together to create windows and lamps with an unprecedented level of detail. The copper foil technique was revolutionary.

Tiffany was constantly innovating and creating. He patented the distinctive Favrile art glass technique in 1894. Unlike the majority of iridescent glass pieces of  the day, the vivid hues of Favrile glass were created by embedding the colors in the molten glass rather than applying them later to the item’s surface. Using metallic oxides and acid fumes, Tiffany could create a distinctive lustre effect. The term Favrile is thought to have been named after the word ‘fabrile’, old French or old English for ‘handmade’, indicating that the range was made by skilled craftsmen.

Although he was rightly renowned for his Favrile art glass creations, stained glass, and exquisite jewelry, Louis Comfort Tiffany also ran a foundry in New York that produced some of the finest bronze sculptures of the late 19th and early 20th century. A descendent of one of Tiffany’s foundry workers brought in some interesting historical memorabilia to one of our appraisal day events, which gave us a fascinating insight to the artistry and industry that went on behind the scenes.

Today we can celebrate the birthday of a prestigious artist and designer who gave the world an extraordinary variety of beautiful and innovative works of art.

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Louis Comfort Tiffany by Reyna Valenzuela on Prezi

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Louis Comfort Tiffany

Project about Louis Comfort Tiffany for Art Appreciation class
by

Reyna Valenzuela

on 5 May 2011

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Louis Comfort Tiffany

Louis Comfort Tiffany Louis Comfort Tiffany (born Feb. 18, 1848; died Jan. 17, 1933) was an American painter, craftsman, philanthropist, decorator, and designer. He was internationally recognized as one of the greatest forces of the Art Nouveau style, who made significant contributions to the art of glassmaking. The son of the famous jeweler Charles Lewis Tiffany, Louis studied under the American painters George Inness and Samuel Colman and also trained as a painter of narrative subjects in Paris. That he was also influenced by a visit to Morocco is evident in some of his major works. Returning to the United States, he became a recognized painter and an associate of the National Academy of Design, New York City; later he reacted against the Academy's conservatism by organizing, in 1877. Tiffany's experiments with stained glass, begun in 1875, led to the establishment, three years later, of his own glassmaking factory in Queens, New York City. By the 1890s he was a leading glass producer, experimenting with unique means of colouring. He became internationally famous for the glass that he named “Favrile.” His Favrile glass was admired abroad, especially in central Europe, where it created a new fashion. Having established a decorating firm known as Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, which served wealthy New Yorkers, Tiffany was commissioned by President Chester A. Arthur to redecorate the reception rooms at the White House, for which he created the great stained-glass screen in the entrance hall. He designed the chapel for the World's Columbian Exposition (1893) in Chicago and the high altar in the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York City.

"Louis (Comfort) Tiffany Biography (1848 - 1933)." Biography. A&E Television Networks, 2011. Web. 20 Apr 2011. <http://www.biography.com/articles/Louis-Comfort-Tiffany-9507399?part=1>. Title: Magnolias & Irises
Artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany
Date: c. 1908 Title: Hibiscus & Parrots
Artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany
Date: c. 1910 - 20 Title: Dogwood
Artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany
Date: c. 1900 - 15 Title: View of Oyster Bay
Artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany
Date: 1908 Title: Autumn Landscape
Artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany
Date: 1923 - 24 Title: Window
Artist: Louis Comfort Tiffany
Date: c. 1900 Tiffany's aesthetic was based on his conviction that nature should be the primary source of design inspiration. Intoxicated by color, he translated into glass the lush palette found in flowers and plants. This fascination with nature and with extending the capabilities of the medium led to the exploration of another technique—in 1893 Tiffany introduced his first blown-glass vases and bowls, called "Favrile," whose name, was taken from an old English word for hand made. Favrile glass quickly gained international renown for its surface iridescence and brilliant colors.
"Louis Comfort Tiffany." The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art. Charles Hosmer Morse Foundation, Inc., 25 Apr 2011. We